Print Print

2

3

yesi

Teachers’ Toolkit in Civic Education – primary school

The publication is created within the European project "Young learners embrace social inclusion and social involvement" (YESI), which includes four organizations: Prosveta-Sofia Foundation, Instituto Politecnico de Santarém (Portugal), Center for non-formal education AENAO (Greece) and Osnovna škola “Hristo Botev” (Сърбия).

The project is implemented within the Erasmus program according to Grant Agreement No. 2019-1-BG01-KA201-062348 with Human Resources Development Center, the Erasmus National Agency for in Bulgaria.

Authors:

© Ass. Prof. PhD Silviya Tsvetanska, Elena Lazarova. (for Prosveta-Sofia Foundation)

©  Ana Da Silva, Ana Torres, Bento Cavadas, Jose Maurício Dias ( for Instituto Politecnico de Santarém)

© Anastasia Timologou (Center for non-formal education AENAO)

Editor: Ass. Prof. PhD Silviya Tsvetanska

National coordinator for the organization of piloting and validation of training resources in Serbia:

Katarina Simeonov - Osnovna škola “Hristo Botev” (Serbia).

The publication is available at http://yesii.eu/en/o1/

The images and graphics used are open and premium licensed by Shutterstock and original images of the partners.

Reproduction is authorized provided the source is acknowledged.

Publisher: © Prosveta-Sofia Foundation, Sofia, 2022

ISBN  978-954-01-4238-8 (pdf)

This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

4

yesi

Acknowledgements

We have the great chance to live in really interesting times. The world has been changing rapidly and we have been facing new challenges - with the COVID-19 pandemic, the migrant crisis which started in 2015 and has now escalated with the people fleeing the war in Ukraine. The world we live in differs quite a lot compared to the place we lived in even a few years ago. The social inequalities have rocketed due to the decline in numerous business resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and the war conflict in Ukraine. Ethnic and religious backgrounds of the people populating the European countries have become drastically more diverse compared to any previous period in the history of the continent. Education, as many other aspects of our lives, has changed with the lockdown in European countries and the uncertainty we will have to live with having no vaccine for newly emerging viruses and war conflicts. This is the reality and we have to learn how to live with it. We have to learn to live together and to benefit from one another. We have to teach our children vital citizenship skills, teach them to be more cooperative, empathic and open to otherness. And schooling can play a vital role in this process. The mission of education is to counteract prejudices and discrimination, and to boost mutual respect and tolerance among groups of people with different lifestyles. To support teachers in their task, we created a Teacher’s Toolkit comprising ready-to-use resources for extracurricular trainings in schools.

The project was inspired by the members of the management board of “Prosveta – Sofia” Foundation, who encouraged the Bulgarian team to involve primary school children in civic education trainings and to design a project aimed at bringing up young people who will make the world a better place to live in, a world of mutual understanding and respect. The Young learners Embrace Social Inclusion and Social Involvement project (YESI, as we call it) and My Europe – Your Europe – Your Say project are part of the large scale idea of “Prosveta - Sofia” Foundation to support the involvement of the whole 7 to 14 age group of students in civic education training activities.

The YESI Teacher’s Toolkit resulted from the collective efforts of “Prosveta - Sofia” Foundation and our partners: AENAO – Greece and Instituto Politecnico de Santarem - Portugal. The final version of the toolkit is also the outcome of the invaluable contribution of the participating teacher-volunteers from Bulgaria, Greece, Portugal and Serbia, who piloted the created teaching resources with their students during school years 2020/ 2021 and 2021/ 2022. Teachers provided tips and suggested changes to the training materials and became co-authors of the digital resources by filming the activities they implement with their students as visual support for other teachers.


       Elena Lazarova
       Researcher and project manager
       YESI  project
       Prosveta – Sofia Foundation
       Bulgaria

5

yesi

Preface

How do we transform from children to active members of the class - our small community? Is it important to know and protect our children’s rights? What does it mean to accept and respect differences? Is it important to live in peace and have all students involved in community life? These are only few of the questions we face in the process of growing up and developing our personalities.

Developing sensitivity, empathy and tolerance towards diversity in the contemporary world is a lengthy and difficult process which takes place mostly at school – while we study and interact with our classmates and teachers, while we do projects, solve problems and follow our dreams. Therefore, this book is also geared toward all teachers who want to support young students aged 7 to 11 in growing up as active citizens. It is geared toward all teachers who don’t simply teach subjects but also use informal education to help children develop social and civic competences. With the activities from the Teacher’s Toolkit students will be encouraged to express themselves and develop skills that enable them to be empathic and tolerant through practical situations and sharing experiences. Besides, students will discover ways to adjust to the world and to change it at the same time. The most important message conveyed in the toolkit is that children, too, can make our world more colourful and a better place to live in as long as we give them the chance to do it; as long as we teach them to take responsibility for their actions. Active citizens fight for their rights without breaching the rights of other people. Active citizens are sensitive to the diversity around them and don’t deny other people’s right to be different.

In this book partners from four educational institutions showcase what civic education is at primary school level considering the specifics of the age group and the different learning styles. Students are given the opportunity to learn about relationship rules and discover the world around them in a dynamic and interactive learning environment, through drama activities, artistic creations, e-games and many more.

6

yesi

Introduction

We are all unique, equally important and have the right to live according to what we believe in, to the customs, practices and the established behavior rules in our community.

The Covid-19 pandemic and the unprecedented restrictive measures and lockdowns in most European countries have resulted in closing of many businesses and even greater social inequalities. Apart from that, globalization, wars and their inevitable consequences, have brought together people from different ethnic origins, nationalities, religious backgrounds, beliefs, traditions and languages. The world we are living in presently, and the world our children will live in, will be much more diverse considering the social status, ethnic backgrounds and beliefs of the people. On the other hand, sharing a common space does not automatically result in overcoming the boundaries of historically constituted communities; it does not necessarily involve opening yourself to otherness, trying to understand differences, valuing diversity and building common grounds for dialogue. But we live together and we should not only tolerate this diversity, we should value it as an opportunity through which we can learn from one another in order to build stronger, more dynamic societies. Human rights, diversity, tolerance and non-violence ways of solving issues have become even more important during the past few years considering recent events like the pandemics, wars, terrorist attacks and    refugee crises.

The existing beliefs, customs, practices and behavior rules within a community naturally come first and they play the most influential role in shaping one’s attitude to the surrounding world. However, schooling could play a key role in overcoming the historically developed negative attitudes to human differences, especially if we talk about young learners from primary school. It could support children in becoming open-minded, compassionate and understanding the ‘other ones’. The realization of this role suggests that teachers have the knowledge, skills and tools which will enable them to discuss with their students any emerging questions on existing notions of human differences in society and the expectations about the behavior towards their bearers rather than avoiding such  questions or reaffirming as true the public valid impressions and expectations.


The Young Learners Embrace Social Inclusion and Social Involvement toolkit describes activities in three major topics: Children’s Rights – Human Rights, Diversity and Social Inclusion, and Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement. But what is the meaning of all these?
1. Children’s Rights – Human Rights: Through the training resources in this module students will learn about Children’s Rights and Human Rights as being set down in international documents. According to the United Nations (United Nations Human Rights), human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever their nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible.

On November 20, 1989 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and it entered into force on 2 September 1990. With this document the United Nations has proclaimed that childhood is entitled to special care and assistance, "the child, by reason of his physical and mental immaturity, needs special safeguards and care, including appropriate legal protection, before as well as after birth".

The Convention on the Rights of the Child consists of 54 articles. The countries which have signed the Convention have agreed to respect and ensure the rights set forth in the Convention to each child within their jurisdiction without discrimination of any kind, irrespective of the child's or his or her parent's or legal guardian's race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national, ethnic or social origin, property, disability, birth or other status.

 “The true character of society is revealed in how it treats its children      

Nelson Mandela    

7

yesi


2. Diversity and Social Inclusion The activiities in this  module will teach students to value better every member of society as a human being, to feel empathy to all children no matter how different they might be, and to involve them in school life.
The concept of diversity encompasses acceptance and respect. It means understanding that each individual is unique, and recognizing our individual differences. Diversity aims to recognize, respect and value people’s differences to contribute and realize their full potential by promoting an inclusive culture for all.
Diversity is all around us; in schools, within families, along the streets of our hometowns and villages, everywhere. Particularly in schools, where more and more students from diverse backgrounds populate the classrooms, it is essential to provide methods and approaches adjustable to the “different” ones. Numerous studies show that diversity in schools needs to be addressed in a manner of “Culturally Responsive Pedagogy” (Heraldo V. Richards; Ayanna F. Brown; Timothy B.Forde, 2007), since teachers educate students who vary in culture, language, abilities and many other characteristics. Therefore, this toolkit will provide activities in order to empower and enrich students with knowledge and skills towards diverse groups of people.
      “It is time for parents to teach young people early that in diversity there is beauty and there is strength.”
                                                                                  Maya Angelou


3. Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement – This module will guide students how to contribute better to life of the community and become involved, how to participate and actively contribute.
The origin of citizenship can be traced back to Ancient Greece, when "citizens" were those who had a legal right to participate in the affairs of the state. However, not everyone was a citizen: slaves, peasants, women or resident foreigners were merely subjects. For those who did have the privileged status of being citizens, the idea of "civic virtue" or being a "good" citizen was an important part of the concept, since participation was not considered only a right but also, and first of all, a duty. A citizen who did not meet his responsibilities was considered socially disruptive. (Council of Europe, 2012)
Terms such as “Active Citizens” and “European Citizenship” are equally important when talking about young children who will become tomorrow’s citizens. Back in 2003 Nelson Mandela said,
   One of the way we can build a better future for our children is by empowering them through allowing them to speak up for themselves. Of course, we as adults have to guide them and to take the ultimate responsibility but that is something quite different from patronising them. The rights of children must, importantly, include the right to be themselves and to talk for themselves.”
                                                                                   
Nelson Mandela

8

yesi

Instruction to teachers


Dear  Educators,

The “Young Learners Embrace Social Inclusion and Social Involvement” project was developed as an effort to support students so that they would respect the different, the diverse and the unique. It is addressed to students aged from 7 to 11 years old. This is the time when they start school where they spend a lot of time, so interventions such as this one can have an actual impact.

Being educators you are given the opportunity to be flexible, deliver the knowledge and play a decisive role in the development, progress and successful completion of the training course. The key elements that can guarantee the successful implementation of the trainings are numerous, and they are all equally worthy - your knowledge about and your firm belief in the project ideas, the training you received, your skills to provide positive emotional atmosphere in the classroom during the training sessions and during everyday teaching, your skills to promote mutual respect among students, encouraging their equal participation and involvement as a way to ensure the effectiveness of the project.

By joining the project you join a large international team of like-minded professional whose main objective is to enhance the development of children’s skills and self-esteem, which originate from their own personal skills. This way you will help students to develop a positive attitude and behavior towards the diversity of personalities and ideas in the world.

In the YESI teacher’s toolkit you will be introduced to new teaching methods and methods typical for non-formal education. Using them in class may be stressful at the beginning. The following words of advice could significantly help you in order to properly implement the trainings.

  • Do not use any teaching methods, which you, yourself, are not ready to participate in.
  • Prepare carefully for the training sessions. Give clear instructions, consider the dimensions and predict the possible turns the activities and discussions may take, although it is not possible to predict all probabilities.
  • Each innovation encompasses a possible rate of failure. Though a well-prepared method could limit such probability, you have to keep in mind that the more methods you use the easier it will be for you to implement methods from non-formal education.
  • Every time you introduce a new method, you can increase the chances for success if:
    • you introduce what you have planned in a specific manner arousing students’ curiosity.
    • you accept the way students think and function even if this way is not the one you expected or aimed at. The solution is to intervene in the improper behavior of a student without rejecting them at the same time.
  • Consider all the objectives that can be achieved when using a specific activity or method. For example, an energizer can be used to stimulate the students but at the same time it could also generate the following positive effects:
    • it can improve children’s communication;
    • it can contribute to the ability of students to accept responsibility;
    • it can help creating a nice atmosphere in the classroom.
  • If you have applied a new teaching method for the first time and it was unsuccessful, this does not mean that this method cannot be effective in the future. On the contrary, try to learn as much as possible from this experience in order to be better prepared next time.
  • You may be puzzled and worried by the fact that the use of active learning methods causes mess and you feel you are losing control of the class. You must bear in mind that applying new teaching methods presupposes a different kind of control. When students work with a variety of methods it is natural that the teacher is not continuously in direct contact with them. The general intervention strategy must be clear and you should be able to intervene when necessary.
  • Consider the sufficiency of time made available for each training resource, as well as the appropriateness of the space you have in the classroom for applying the specific method (size, furniture arrangement and proximity to other classrooms).
  • Last but not least: Relax and have fun! After all this is what Non-formal Education is about!

9

yesi

Class preparation for the training course and the training  sessions


 

The HOPES&FEARS/ GROUP CONTACT session is to be held at the beginning of the school year prior to the planned training sessions making use of the resources in the Teacher’s Toolkit.

Hopes & Fears / Group Contract

>

Topic / Activity Name

Hopes & Fears / Group Contract

Duration

35 min

Aim / Objectives

  • To clarify objectives and expectations of students
  • To clarify the “rules” and the “values” of the group
  • To create a safe learning environment
  • To facilitate participants' communication on different levels.

Preparation

  • Suggested Reading, Tips, etc.
  • Materials

Materials:

  • For Hopes & Fears
  • Post-it notes in two different colours, i.e. yellow and blue (one for hopes, one for fears)
  • 2 large size carton papers in two different colours (one for hopes, one for fears)
  • Markers
  • Sticky tape to stick cartons at wall
  • Relaxing Music (optional)
  • For Group Contract
  • Large size carton or flipchart paper
  • Markers
  • Sticky tape to stick at wall
  • Tips

The teacher can ask students (prior to this introductory exercise, during a break or Arts lesson) to draw on the 2 carton papers something that symbolizes HOPES (i.e. an island with calm sea surrounding it, a tree etc) and FEARS (i.e. a scarecrow, a thunderstorm etc).

Introduction

This exercise should be done as an introductory exercise, so that students would begin to have an “idea” of what is going to happen in the next following weeks or months.

10

yesi

Methodology

Hopes & Fears

The teacher sticks on the wall the large-sized cartons with the two drawings and explains that one of the drawing stands for the hopes that students have on training course and the other one stands for their fears.

Each student gets 2 posts-it notes; one yellow, one blue. Students are instructed to write their expectations/hopes about the training course on the yellow paper and their fears on the blue paper. Once they everybody is ready, they go altogether at the cartons stuck on the classroom walls and stick their posts-it notes on them. After that everybody goes back to their seats. Firstly, the teacher reads the hopes (he/she can categorize them if there are similarities). Then she/he reads the fears (which also could be grouped).

Finally the teacher explains to the students that their post-it notes with the Hopes & Fears will remain on the wall until the end of the training course.

                                                                                                  15’

At the end of the training course, the teacher asks the students to have a look again at their Hopes & Fears and reflect on them. Did their fears have grounds? Were there issues that had been overcome? Has the project met their expectations?

Students can have a small conversation on the plenary and discuss their Hopes & Fears and what might have been organized in a different way.                                                                                               10’

Group Contract

The teacher discusses with students that this training course (project) will help them learn more about Human Rights, Diversity and Social inclusion, and Active Citizenship and Social Involvement in a different way compared to what they are used to. Activities will be shaped like games and they will be very practical. Since the group will be together in the training course (project) for several weeks or months, it would be good to establish together specific rules which everyone knows and respects.

The teacher guides the conversation and the students brainstorm about the rules they want to establish, for example: everyone’s opinion will be respected, there will be no judgment of opinions, everyone will respect silence when it is required,  participation is important because the activities are linked to all students as members of the group (class), etc. The teacher or a student writes all the “rules” on a carton paper or a flipchart. Once the list is ready, all students sign the Group Contract and it is stuck on the wall until the end of the project (training course).                                         15’

11

yesi

Opening a training session

We all know that if you eager to do an activity and start doing it with positive expectations, the outcomes are far more likely to be better and the intervention – to be more efficient. Students may come to class either with great interest, or not be interested at all. Sometimes the teacher may face notable resistance if he/she begins directly with the planned theme. The students in the class may at first need to calm down or to be stimulated. There is a series of methods that can be used to start a training session:

  • Begin with an energiser to evoke the students’ interest (as suggested on the toolkit).
  • Use a relaxation exercise or appropriate music when children are very unquiet (as suggested on the toolkit).
  • If students are facing a problem, then perhaps it would be better to deal with it at first. In practice you may discover that this particular issue can cover the entire activity although it was not planned.


Closing a training session


At the end of each training there must be time left to connect and close the issues raised, and students must have time to prepare the topic for the next training session. It is important that nothing is left hanging in the air. All issues should be properly resolved. The activity should also be closed by making positive comments on:

  • what has been achieved
  • the dynamic of the team
  • the progress made
  • the significant facts established by the team
  • any unusual incident that may have occurred
  • the work to be prepared for the next training session (depending on the training that follows).

12

yesi

NON-FORMAL EDUCATION

Teaching methods

In European projects – particularly within the frame of Erasmus - it is preferable to apply non-traditional teaching methods, which create a pleasant atmosphere in the class and turn learning into an interesting experience. In order to choose a method we have taken into consideration the aims of the resource. An appropriate method encourages students to identify situations in the reality of daily life and it gives them the opportunity to discuss issues as seen from their perspective. To ensure success of the method it is necessary to prepare it in the right manner.

This manual consists of 38 resources distributed in three modules: Children’s Rights - Human Rights; Diversity and Social Inclusion; and Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement. Each training resource consists of two tools: (a) Non Formal Education (NFE) Tool and (b) Digital Tool (DT). The NFE tool describes the “exercises” (activities) which should be utilized with the group. The DT is an extra tool which is to be used to enrich the NFE tool. Depending on the resource, the DT could be used either prior, during or after the implementation of the activities. The NFE tools used are somehow “repeatable”; the same tool (method) can be used in a variety of resources. The same principle accounts for the DT’s.

The methods (NFE tools), which are applied in the present toolkit, are described below:


1. Team work

It has been established that team work in small groups of 4-6 students is a very effective working method. In small groups students have the opportunity to acquire knowledge, to comprehend and apply such knowledge while shaping attitudes and making choices. By discussing, participating and communicating in the group, students can develop and exercise appropriate skills.

Organizing the class into small groups can be achieved in different ways:

The educator explicates an activity and students shape small groups of 4-6 persons in which they practice different activities.

  • The activities could involve discussion, artistic creation, presentation, video making, role playing, brainstorming, simulation etc. All these activities could be utilized through team work, where the key element is the same; working in small groups.

The educator introduces the topic, students discuss it in groups and present their conclusions to all members of the class.

Students could work individually and afterwards discuss their conclusions in their group.

By discussing in the class, an issue is raised and students are divided into small groups in order to discuss and propose solutions.


13

yesi
2. Brainstorming

Brainstorming is a creative method aiming at expressing a variety of ideas. It can be applied for several reasons; most commonly it is used in order to cover as many aspects of the topic under discussion as possible.

Brainstorming does not mean simply asking for ideas from others. For an effective brainstorming session there are a few rules to be followed:

  • the question or topic must be well defined;
  • team members are encouraged to express any idea crossing their mind as an answer to the question. No one should comment on the others’ ideas. We insist on it.

Brainstorming is quite simple to utilize. The educator writes the topic or question on the blackboard, then explains the rules to the class setting a time limit, e.g. 5 minutes. Students are asked to begin. The educator writes the ideas on the blackboard quickly. If there is a gap established, the educator can fill it in his/her ideas. Depending on the  ideas, they could be categorized, i.e. a few ideas could fall under the same “major” category.

The next step is to process the ideas and move on to action. In some cases it may be necessary to ask students to specify some ideas. At this stage some ideas can be clarified, evaluated, chosen and ranked. This procedure is necessary in order to differentiate the ideas, i.e. if there is no differentiation during acceptance of ideas, there will probably be the impression that all ideas are equal and acceptable.

14

yesi
3. Role-playing games

In role-playing games a certain situation is carried over from the real world into the frame of the role-playing game. Role-playing games are useful when we wish to analyze certain behaviors or to test new or alternative behaviors within a controlled and safe framework. In order to use the role-playing games it is necessary to have a warm and open-minded atmosphere in the class.

It is important that all participants are aware of the meaning of the role-playing games and that they agree on certain basic rules in order to work together in a structured manner. Therefore, the educator has to explain in brief the methodology of the role-playing games and further on, the class has to set some rules for the students playing the roles, and for the students watching the performance, before the game starts. Then, the topic is defined as a certain situation and the participating characters are described in detail in order to help all participants to understand their roles. The different scenes should not last longer than a few minutes.

Students, not participating actively in the role-playing game, function as observers and they are the audience. The educator acts as the coordinator or “director” and he/she is responsible for planning, carrying out and evaluating the activity.


4. Simulation
A simulation game (Patricia K. Tompkins, 1998) is a recreation of a real-world situation, designed to explore key elements of that situation. Similarly to role playing, simulations always include an element of role. During a simulation game the students need to perform a certain situation based on real life situations, while in role playing the participants represent and experience some character type known in everyday life.
5. Artistic creation (drawing, painting, collage)Certain forms of art are a useful non-formal teaching approach within a group. Students do not just discuss or write about different social situations, but they also capture and express these situations in paintings, drawings, performances, etc. They can also make collages to express themselves and their opinion without requiring a certain talent or specialized skills. It is important that students overcome their fears regarding artistic creation. Therefore, the educator should spend some time in order to make students understand that the aim of the activity is not to create a work of art but to  express themselves in a free manner.


15

yesi
6. Case study

A case study (UNSW Australia) is an account of an activity, event or problem that contains a real or hypothetical situation. Case studies can be used in order to help students understand how the complexities of real life influence decisions. A common case usually:

  • is taken from real life (but it can be hypothetical);
  • consists of different parts and each part usually ends with problems and points for discussion. There may not be a   clear cut off point to the situation;
  • includes sufficient information for the reader to treat problems and issues;
  • is believable for the reader (the case contains the setting, personalities, sequence of events, problems and  conflicts).

A case study is given to students as an example in order for them to implement an exercise, while at the same time trying to focus on the issue described.

*All material used for the purposes of this project is located on the project’s website (http://yesii.eu/en/activities_en/). Educators, and in some cases students, will be instructed to use the materials given in the description of each resource.


7. Guided Drama

In guided drama students are presented a case as far as general settings and characters are concerned. They are guided through the framework of the plot by receiving descriptions of planned events (meetings) and of their tasks in the respected meetings (messages). They are encouraged to step in the shoes of the characters and, keeping to the provided information, are free to decide on the story, i.e. details of the plot, characters’ speech, etc. The printed information is distributed to the students shortly before the events; students read it and plan their actions and speech right away, similarly to ‘speed dating’ techniques.


8. Mind Map

A mind map (Wikipedia) is a diagram used to visually organize information. A mind map is often created around a single concept, drawn as an image in the center of a blank page, to which associated representations of ideas such as images, words and parts of words are added. Major ideas are connected directly to the central concept, and other ideas branch out from those. Mind maps can be drawn by hand, either as "rough notes" during a lecture, meeting or planning session, for example, or as higher quality pictures when more time is available.

16

yesi

9. Blue skies thinking
Blue skies thinking is a well-known and widely used interactive method for generating ideas. It encourages participants to use their imaginations and be creative. It helps elicit numerous solutions to any given problem; for example, ‘what should I do in this situation?’ or ‘how can we overcome this obstacle?’. No evaluation of any kind is allowed in a ‘thinking-up’ session. If you judge and evaluate ideas as they are expressed, people will focus more on defending their ideas than on thinking up new and better ones. Everyone is encouraged to ‘think-up’ as many ideas as possible. ‘Wild’ or different
ideas should be encouraged even though they might sound foolish.
Participants should build upon or modify the idea of others.
How to do blue skies thinking?

17

yesi
  • Seat the participants informally;
  • Provide a flipchart pad or blackboard for recording ideas;
  • State the problem or issue to be addressed;
  • State the ground rules: for example, no evaluation of ideas is allowed, and no judgment as to worth.

The more ideas, the better; strive for:

  • quantity and build upon the ideas of others (combine, modify, etc.);
  • Ask for ideas and record them as fast as they come – do not edit them;
  • Encourage new ideas by adding your own;
  • Discourage derisive laughter, comments or ridicule of any ideas;
  • Discuss and evaluate the ideas generated.

10. Snowballing

Snowballing enables participants to think about their own responses and gradually reach out to those around them to consider the thoughts of others on an issue.


How to do snowballing? The teacher asks a question and/or poses a scenario and gives the participants a few moments to reflect. Then, participants are asked to turn to the person next to them and discuss their thoughts. Depending on the activity, the teacher may ask participants to prioritize their ideas, come to consensus on their top priorities, etc. (allow several minutes). Then, each pair turns to another pair and discusses their thoughts.

18

yesi

USE OF DIGITAL TOOLS

The digital tools that are shown in this toolkit are specifically chosen and designed for the purposes of the YESI project. The lesson plans describing the training sessions are enriched with one or several e- resources (digital tools), which are aimed at helping students learn about the respective topics in a more efficient and fun way. Depending on the training session, the e-resources from the Digital Tool can be used prior, during or after the implementation of the activity (instructions are given in each lesson plan).

The e-resources from the Digital Tool are uploaded on the project’s website http://yesii.eu/en/o2/ and students can watch, play, learn, investigate through the use of films, online quizzes/questionnaires, interactive games, animation cartoon videos, prezi/ppt presentations etc.

19

yesi

EVALUATION

Evaluation is the process of estimating the effectiveness of a training course and it should be an integral part of every training and learning procedure.

Evaluation deals with:

  • the extent the training course (project) as a whole meets its objectives,
  • assessment which specific methods turned out to be effective for the fulfillment of the goals
  • tips and recommendations for upgrading the evaluated items so as to meet the users’ needs.


Evaluation activities are carried out in order to examine:

  • Appropriateness: Does the training course meet students’ needs, interests and anxieties?
  • Effectiveness: Does it achieve the aim and objectives that it was designed for?
  • Methodology: Are the suggested activities and methods the appropriate ones?
  • Coordination: Does the team coordinator in the school have the skills to communicate and work together with the team members in order to facilitate the learning process?

What is to be evaluated?

  • Contents: Is contents structured to meet students’ needs, interests and anxieties and ensure achieving the aim and objectives?.
  •  Organization and presentation: Are the described activities in the lesson plan organized logically and presented clearly using multiple methods and modes that motivate and increase openness to the diversity of the world and foster students’ social involvement skills as they engage in high interest, practical activities?
  • Instructional design and support: Does the instructional design use research-based instructional strategies and provide opportunities to engage in high interest, age-appropriate activities that mirror real-life situations, and make cross-curricular, global connections?
  • Equity and accessibility: Are the suggested activities and e-resources free from bias in describing ethnic groups, gender, age, disabilities, cultures, religion, etc. Do they consider multiple learning styles and the trainees’ cultural differences?

Within the Young learners embrace social inclusion and social involvement (YESI) project evaluation was carried out to examine the Teacher’s Toolkit (TT) comprising the Teacher’s Manual (TM) with the lesson plans and the e- resources from the Digital Tools Resource Pack (DT).

20

yesi


Energizers



yesi


























* The suggested energizers are different and some of them could take longer, but, as a rule, they are expected to last only a couple of minutes.
With the preparation and the time needed to launch and do the described energizers, this is estimated to last 5 minutes.

21

yesi
Energizers yesi 1 - Break the Circle

The teacher assigns randomly a number to each student, depending on the group size, i.e. for 20 students, numbers 1-4 are ok, so each group has 5 people (groups could be synthesized by the students with the same number, i.e. all having been assigned number ‘1’ or by students where each one has his/her own unique number 1-4; similarly and more fun is grouping by ingredient for a Greek salad, where every student is i.e. ‘tomato’, ‘cucumber’, ‘onion’, ‘oregano’, etc.) Once the groups have been formed, they make  circles and the teacher randomly picks a number (or an ingredient) to step out of the circle and try to break in, while the others remaining are instructed to not let go of their hands no matter what. This can be repeated once more with another number stepping out.

Energizers yesi 2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Energizers yesi 3 - Amoeba

An evolution game! Everyone starts off as an amoeba, with the purpose of evolving to a human. All students walk around acting like an amoeba and when they meet with another amoeba, they play one round of rock/paper/scissors. Whoever wins evolves into a worm. When two worms meet they play again rock/paper/scissors and whoever wins turns into a wasp, but whoever loses goes back to becoming an amoeba. This continues until one becomes human. The evolution stages are: amoeba à worm à wasp à chicken à monkey à human.

Energizers yesi 4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Energizers yesi 5 - Good morning or evening

Everybody walks around the room greeting each other (as if everybody was their close friends) using words and gestures (shake hand, kiss, hug). Then they repeat the greeting in silence using only their eyes. When the exercise is over, the teacher asks students how did they feel with the two different ways of greeting (eg was it difficult, how did they manage to communicate, etc).

22

yesi

Energizers yesi 6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Energizers yesi 7 - Connecting eyes

Participants stand in a circle. Each person makes eye contact with another person across the circle. The two walk across the circle and exchange positions, while maintaining eye contact. Many pairs can exchange at the same time, and the group should try to make sure that everyone in the circle is included in the exchange. Tip: Begin by trying this in silence and then exchange greetings in the middle of the circle.

Variations: If the teacher considers, knowing the class atmosphere, that some students might be left not participating, i.e. they try to make eye contact but nobody responds to them and they have no chance to move from their initial position, the moderator could divide the class in 2 groups and introduce a competitive element – after the activity each group will be marked on the ‘team spirit thermometer’ (which could be printed on a A4 paper and the teacher marks the degrees with a marker). The more people you have left not participating in the ‘eye contact’ activity – the lower the degrees to be marked on the thermometer.

Energizers yesi 8 - Find another seat:

Have the students sit on chairs in a circle, with the number of chairs being one less than the number of students. The student without a chair stands in the middle and tells their name. Then the student calls out a characteristic or a colour, or type of clothing, e.g. “Everyone wearing orange!”. All participants who are wearing orange must get up and find another seat, but not the one immediately to their right or left. The student in the middle races to find a seat and the person left standing becomes the next caller in the middle.

Energizers yesi 9 - Balloon pop

Have everyone form a circle. Instruct the participants to put one piece of information about themselves, e.g. I have 2 sisters, or my mother is called Samy,  on a small slip of paper, fold it, and put it in a blown up balloon. Throw the balloons in the middle of the circle and then have people take turns popping a balloon, reading the piece of paper, and guessing to whom the information applies. Participants could wander round the room asking ‘yes/ no’ questions to the other participants but not exactly the statement from the paper slip, e.g. they cannot ask “Have you got 2 sisters? But could ask “Have you got sisters?” and then “Have you got more than 1 sister?’, “Have got less than 3 sisters?”, etc. Game finishes when all participants have identified the author of the paper slip they have.

*Note: this exercise should be used if there is enough time.

23

yesi

Energizers yesi 10 - Rope game

Have the participants stand on the middle of a space cleared of desks, chairs, etc. Divide the room in a way that allows them easily to move from one half of the room to the other, e.g. by placing a long piece of rope on the floor. The teacher stands at one of the ends of the rope and calls out a characteristic, or a colour or a letter, e.g.  “Everyone having blue eyes!”; “Everyone having 3 brothers”, “Everyone whose name begins with B”, etc. and points to the part of the room where the participants wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names have to move to. All participants who are wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names move to the respective part of the room; the ones who are not , have to go to the other part. Questions have to be constructed so that the class does not divide in groups having comparatively equal number of students, i.e. one of the groups should consist (in most cases) of one, two or few students. Debriefing: Participants are asked to share how they felt when they were part of a big group; and when they were standing alone (or were part of a very small group); what did they feel of themselves (as part of a small/ big group), and what their feelings were towards the group they were not part of.

Energizers yesi 11 - Alphabetical order

Students make a circle with the chairs, take off their shoes and get on the chairs (one per person - the circle needs to be as close as possible). Standing on the chairs and just moving from one to another one without getting off, students have to arrange themselves in alphabetical order according to their name. As soon as they are ready, teacher will check if they are right; if not they continue until they are right. 

Energizers yesi 12 - Body spelling

Teacher asks students to write their name in the air using different parts of their body, for example with the hand/leg/elbow/nose.

Optional: If time allows teacher asks to the class to spell out some words reproducing the letters with their bodies. Students can collaborate all together or can create different groups.

Energizers yesi 13 - Simon says

Teacher tells the group that they should follow instructions when he/she starts the instruction by saying “Simon says...”. If the teacher does not begin the instructions with the words “Simon says”, then the group should not follow the instructions! The teacher begins by saying something like “Simon says clap your hands” while clapping their hands. The participants follow. The teacher speeds up the actions, always saying “Simon says” first. After a short while, the “Simon says” is omitted. Those participants who do follow the instructions anyway are ‘out’ of the game. The game can be continued for as long as it remains fun.

Energizers yesi 14 - I am going on a trip

Everyone sits in a circle. Start by saying “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug”, and hug the person to your right. That person then has to say “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug and a pat on the back”, and then give the person on their right a hug and a pat on the back. Each person repeats what has been said and adds a new action to the list. Go round the circle until everyone has had a turn.

24

yesi

Energizers yesi 15 - Animal roundup

The teacher tells to the class to silently think of an animal. Then he/she tells to the group that without talking, they need to arrange themselves on a line from largest to smallest animals. Group members can only make gestures and the noise of their animal. After they have finished, teacher ask to the students to say the animal they were supposed to be to see if the order is correct.

Energizers yesi 16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Energizers yesi 17 - Toaster or Rock Star

The group starts in a circle with one person in the center. The person in the center points at someone in the circle and says “Toaster” or “Rock star”.

  • If the person in the center says “toaster”, the person being pointed at needs to crouch down and jump up and say “butter me I’m done.” The people on either side should arms up and out strait creating a “toaster” around the person being pointed at.
  • If the person in the center says “Rock star”, the person being pointed at needs to hold his/her hands in front of their mouth as if he/she were singing into a microphone. The people on each side turn away from the person who’s been pointed at and pretend to play the guitar.

Energizers yesi 18 - Mosquito game

The group stands in a circle and the facilitator tells a story about a plague of mosquitoes and that everybody has to kill the mosquitoes so as they don’t get malaria. The facilitator puts up a mosquito on the head of a person who must lower in order to avoid the mosquito. The two persons next to that person must clap their hands above his/her head to kill the mosquito, but the mosquito escapes and it goes on. When the group is already doing the game well and quickly, the facilitator will add more mosquitoes until it is almost impossible for the group to catch as many mosquitoes.

Energizers yesi 19 - Grab the finger

In a circle, place right finger on next person s left palm.  Try to grab a finger before yours gets grabbed. After doing several times switch; place left finger on next person s right palm and repeat the process for a few times.

25

yesi

Energizers yesi 20 - Chief of clan

Everyone stands in a circle. One participant closes his/her eyes or steps out of the room. He/She will have to guess who is the chief of the clan. One participant volunteers to be the secret Chief (quietly, so the "guesser" can't hear anything). The chief begins an action such as snapping fingers, patting the tummy, or slapping knees, and everyone in the circle imitates him/her.  The guesser returns to the room and tries to figure out who the chief is. As the guesser looks around, the chief changes the action avoiding being detected.

Energizers yesi 21 - Name game with balls

Students stand in a circle. The teacher gives a ball to one of the students. He/she holds the ball, then says the name of another participant and passes them the ball. After a few passes, the teacher adds one more ball in the game, and then – another one. This way there will be 2/3/4 balls in the air at a time and all participants will be calling each other’s names

Energizers yesi 22 - Names and adjectives

Participants stand in a circle; they think of an adjective to describe character or how they are feeling. The adjective must start with the same letter as their name, for instance, “I’m Maria and I’m merry”. Or, “I’m Alexander and I’m amazing.” As they say this, they can also mime an action that presents the adjective in a meaningful way. (N.B. In the national language versions of the TM there should be used popular names for the country and relevant adjectives in the respective language).

Variation (use if time allows): The game could also be used a memory game (concentration game) to check if the rest of the group has remembered the ‘name-adjective’ pairs. After several rounds (each participant repeating his name and adjective, the teacher/ a game master, checks if the group remembers the ‘names-adjectives’ fixed pairs by saying the name of one of the students, e.g. ‘Maria’; Maria steps forward to the middle of the circle and the rest of the group are expected to come up with the adjective previously linked to the name by saying “Maria is merry”. If they cannot guess, the participant in the circle (Maria) might mime again the adjective as a tip.

26

yesi


Relaxing Exercises



yesi


























* The suggested relaxing exercises are different and some of them could take longer, but, as a rule, they are expected to last only a couple of minutes.
With the preparation and the time needed to do the relaxing activities and to end the lesson, this is estimated to last at most 5 minutes.

27

yesi
Relaxing Exercises yesi 1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Relaxing Exercises yesi 2 - Progressive muscle relaxation

To release tension from head to toe, students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each. The teacher guides the students; he/she asks them to start with the feet and toes, then move up to the knees, thighs, rumps, chest, arms, hands, neck, jaw, and eyes—all while maintaining deep, slow breaths.

Kelly Roper

Relaxing Exercises yesi 3 - Guided breathing

Teacher asks the students to close their eyes (if comfortable), inhale for a count of four, then exhale for a count of four (all through the nose, which adds a natural resistance to the breath). Then, with one hand on the chest and the other on the belly, the students can take a deep breath in through the nose and exhale through the mouth, ensuring this way that the diaphragm (not the chest) inflates with enough air to create a stretch in the lungs

Jordan Shakeshaft

Relaxing Exercises yesi 4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Relaxing Exercises yesi 5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

28

yesi

Relaxing Exercises yesi 6 - Bee breathing

The teacher instructs the students to get in a comfortable position to practice bee breathing. They have to imagine that they are sitting on a leaf or a flower petal, to sit straight and allow the leaf or petal to gently support them.

The teacher gives students the following instructions:

Breathe in, allowing the air to just gently come in through your nose, filling up your lungs.

As you breathe out, buzz like a bee. See how long your buzz can last. See how far your bee is going to fly before sitting down and resting again. Buzz. Buzz. Buzz.

On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a loud, strong buzz.

On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a soft buzz.

When the exercise is finished, the teacher gives time for a short discussion:

Does it feel different with a strong or a soft buzz?

How does your body feel?

Optional (use if time allows): After breathing practice, draw a picture of a bumblebee and the leaf or flower that you were “sitting on” in your imagination. This picture can be used as a relaxation practice reminder. When you see the picture, practice being like a Bee on a leaf and practice a Bee breath.

Relaxing Exercises yesi 7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Relaxing Exercises yesi 8 - Seasons of the year

All players sit in a circle, but not too close to one another. The teacher moves like a plant during the seasons of the year.

Winter: the plants are small, weak and are crunched together on the ground.

Spring: through the stronger sunshine, the plants grow slowly and slowly rise.

Summer: through the warm sun, the plants slowly open their arms, the flowers open their blooms are stand up straight.

Autumn: the sun rays become weaker. The plants begin to slowly shrivel, the blooms and leaves begin to fall away.

29

yesi

Relaxing Exercises yesi 9 - Lion's breath

Lion’s breath is a playful way to release and relax into more peaceful feelings. The trainer tells students that they are going to do a breath called the lion’s breath in order to let go of feelings or thoughts we no longer want. This breath is very helpful in getting those ideas out of us and pushing them far away.

Instructions

  • Imagine that you are a mighty lion. You have a giant roar!
  • Sit on your heels and sit up tall like a mighty, proud, lion. Get ready to let your roar go!
  • Think of a feeling or a thought that you would like to let go. Squeeze your hands into fists, holding tight and thinking of that feeling or thought.
  • Take a deep breath in and let your roar out, stick out your tongue at the same, stretch your arms out wide in front of you and open your hands wide, roaring out the feeling or thought and letting it go.
    • Repeat.

Relaxing Exercises yesi 10 - Mountain range

Stand side by side in a line, in mountain pose, your feet hip-width apart.  Each foot must touch the foot of the person on each side. Walk (as a group) across the room without separating their feet from your partner’s.
If the group comes apart, you must begin again.

Variation: Ask the students to walk on their toes.

Relaxing Exercises yesi 11 - Breathing exercise

Teacher asks students to make a circle and do the following exercises, repeating each one few times and alternate them. Teacher can also add new ones.

Breathing in raise your arms above your head and say “Elevator Up!”  Breathing out, float your arms back down to your sides, saying “Elevator Down.”  Repeat.

Take three quick breaths in while wiggling your nose.  Wiggle your nose on each breath in.  Then wiggle your nose on each breath out.

Hold your hand in front of your nose and hiss hiss hiss while breathing out.

Relaxing Exercises yesi 12 - Warm back

A piece of paper is stuck to each student’s back and they are given a pen. The paper is already prepared. Each piece of paper says: “I like………..”. Slow music is played and the students walk around and write characteristics about the person whom they like on the paper. Each child is allowed to look at the paper at the end and take it home.

30

yesi

Relaxing Exercises yesi 13 - Body massage

The students stand in a circle: they need to follow all the movement the teacher does and massage themselves. The teacher starts to massage different parts of his/her body, starting from the head till the feet (it’s better if they take off their shoes). The teacher explains how the massage needs to be done, if delicate or more energetic.

Optional: The teacher can also ask to the students to massage another classmate.

Relaxing Exercises yesi 14 - Give me your energy

The students stand in a circle. The teacher starts, pretending he/she is holding a ball on the hands and passing it to the student on his/her right; this one do the same, until the ball comes back to the teacher. The ball needs to be passed in a gentle way, as it is very precious. At the second round, the teacher passes the ball to students in another side of the circle, making a gesture and a noise. The students will do the same until everyone will have touched the ball at least once.  The ball can be passed in any way (in form of kick, kiss…), pretending it becomes bigger or smaller depending on the will of the students. 

Relaxing Exercises yesi 15 - Moving like a toy

The teacher uses a magic word to change the students into many string-loaded (wind-up) toys. At the teacher’s signal, the toys start to move across the class, as many robots, to get their sits. They have to move more quickly at the beginning and then gradually more and more slowly, because their charge is finishing. Some of them will be frozen in the middle of the room, and the teacher has to give their cranks one more turn to help them reach their seats

Relaxing Exercises yesi 16 - Pass the face

It is like the game "telephone" but instead of passing a word or sentence around the group, participants pass a facial expression.
The group forms a circle with everyone having their eyes closed, except the person who is passing the "face" in the first place. The passer will tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him, that person will open her/his eyes to receive the face. She/He will then tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him and pass the face along. Once participants have passed the face they may keep their eyes open to watch it move around the group. At the end, the original passer receives the face from the last person in the group and then shows what the original face was.
 

Relaxing Exercises yesi 17 - Circle massage

The group forms a circle and faces one direction. Each participant places his/her hands on the shoulders of the person in front of her/him. Each person then gives the person who is in front a shoulder massage. The person being massaged can give a feedback. After a few minutes, the group turns the other way so that the person who has been making the massage is then receiving it in return.

31

yesi

Relaxing Exercises yesi 18 - Making room

Participants are asked to raise their arms with palms facing up, imagining that they are pushing up the ceiling and are asked do a lot of strength in that direction to increase the space of the room where they are. Then they are asked to turn the arms down with palms facing down thinking that they are pushing down the floor. They are asked to push away the walls turning their left arm and palm to the wall on their left and their right arm and palm to the wall that’s on their right.

Relaxing Exercises yesi 19 - Massage ball

One ball is given to each participant and, following the rhythm of a soft music, they place the ball between their back and a wall. They bend their knees slightly to relax the legs and better place their back. Then they move their body from top to bottom and from right to left and vice versa, moving the ball around their back. When making movements of their body, they will notice some more tense (and sometimes painful) spots. When they notice this they should stop and stay quiet keeping their back against the wall, making the desired pressure and holding for a while.

Variation: Do not use the wall. Participants work in pairs and one holds 1 or 2 balls in their hands and makes the massage to the other and then they switch.

Relaxing Exercises yesi 20 - Holding legs

Participants work in pairs. And you can put a quiet and relaxing music (or sounds like water falling down, sea waves, etc.). 

Half of the participants are asked to lie down face up, eyes closed, with their left leg extended on the floor and their right leg elevated. Another participant stands up and loops a towel around the heel of the other’s right foot and holds the ends of the towel in his/her hands, and makes soft and gentle movements (upwards and downwards, and sidewards) while the other totally relaxes his/her leg. Then they repeat the same process with the left leg. Then the participants switch roles.

32

yesi



Activities



yesi

33

yesi



Human Rights - Children's Rights

34

yesi
1 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / Freedom from discrimination
Developed by AENAO
Duration 65
Energizers yesi     8 - Find another seat:

Have the students sit on chairs in a circle, with the number of chairs being one less than the number of students. The student without a chair stands in the middle and tells their name. Then the student calls out a characteristic or a colour, or type of clothing, e.g. “Everyone wearing orange!”. All participants who are wearing orange must get up and find another seat, but not the one immediately to their right or left. The student in the middle races to find a seat and the person left standing becomes the next caller in the middle.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives
  • To raise awareness that diversity exists and it is often connected to discrimination
  • To look up for ways to non-discriminate people
Preparation

Materials

Computers, whiteboard/flipchart, markers, Projector (optional)

Introduction

According to Article 2 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, every child shall be protected against all forms of discrimination including his or her parent's or legal guardian's race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national, ethnic or social origin, property, disability, birth or other status.

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background or his religion. People learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

Nelson Mandela

Methodology

NFE Tool Quiz, Discussion, Brainstorming, Word Search Puzzle, Movie

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Children's Rights prior to the activity HR_Intro.

  1. Students take the quiz given in HR1 - L.A. Trip (5’)

Note: The quiz is given in the animated movie, and in a separate link HR1 - L.A. Trip Quiz

  1. Teacher initiates a discussion about the results of the quiz - which is connected to discrimination.

- Those that had resulted in a negative result and therefore “lost” the trip to L.A. how do they feel as “discrimination” victims. How do they feel that they do not meet the criteria of the quiz (which are of course arbitrary).

- Those that had resulted in a positive result and therefore “won” the trip to L.A. how do they feel that are “favored” among their peers. How do they feel that they meet the criteria of the quiz (which are again arbitrary).

Other questions / concerns could be: if the students feel injustice with this test, if there is something to be done in order to minimise this injustice. (10’)

  1. Students brainstorm on what is considered discrimination. The teacher at this point should assist the students to think about what is described in Article 2 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, i.e. freedom from discrimination based on gender, skin colour, ethnicity, etc. (5’)

  2. Students now complete the word search puzzle given in HR1 - Anti-discrimination.

Tip: The puzzle can be completed either by each student or the teacher can show it on a projector and students can search for the words all together. (5’)

  1. Students watch the movie Tzafar (2’)

  2. Teacher asks students about the discrimination that is shown in the movie and ways that should be avoided. (5’)

Reflection

Optional (see Notes below)

Notes

Since there is discussion in the plenary right after the two DT’s (quiz and movie), it is not necessary for the teacher to do a reflection - it is optional. Reflection could include a summary of the discussions and the brainstorming.
In addition:
Teacher and Students can watch the following videos (optional) at home - or if there is enough time after the completion of the activity: Lambs
- A movie for difference and acceptance: Ian
- A movie for disability, non-discrimination and integration (5')

Digital Resource

HR_Intro

HR1 - L.A. Trip

HR1 - L.A. Trip Quiz

HR1 - Anti-discrimination

Tzafar


YESI 2023/02/03

35

yesi
2 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to life, liberty and personal security
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives

Students will:

  • reflect about the importance of the right to life, liberty and security;
  • feel the impact of restrictions on the human right to life, liberty and security.
Preparation

Suggested reading:

Required equipment: projector and laptop

Introduction

All children have the right to life. After they are born, adults take care of them to grow up. They protect them and help them feel safe and secure. To introduce the topic, use the experience of the children by asking them to share situations in which they felt protected; when others helped them survive or deal with the difficulties in their lives.

If this is your first activity from module "Human rights - Children's rights", first play the introductory video to get students in the topic.                                                                                                   5'

Methodology

NFE Tool: game, brainstorming

  1. Show the photo from HR2_1 and ask them to name the first thing that comes to their minds when seeing the picture. Put down key words – associations as worded by the children, e.g. protection, roof, security …. Considering the students’ personal experiences start a discussion why it is important to protect our life and to feel protected.                           10’
  2. Game.

Round 1:Students are asked to stand tightly in a circle next to each other. One student is out of the circle and tries to get into it, but the others don't let him in.

Round 2: Another student goes outside the circle and tries to persuade the students from the circle to let him go in.

Round 3: A student is in the circle, squatting; all the others are clustered tightly around him. He tries to stand up and make the others let him have more space around him, but they stand very close to him and do not allow him to have more space and move freely around.

The game can be played several times (all the rounds) so that more students may feel what it is like to be restricted (threatened) or be part of a big group restricting somebody.  The game is a practical way to help student feel what it is like to have your liberty restricted and feel threatened and insecure.                                                                                                          15’

3. Discussion: after the game students start the reflection through questions asking them to think how they felt in the different roles; why it is important to respect the right to liberty and free life of others.                                                                                                                                         5’

4. Play the video (HR2_2).                                                                                                          5’

5. Based on what you have seen in the video, summarize what adults and states do to guarantee the right to life, liberty and security of children.                                                               5’

Reflection

Suggested questions to stimulate reflection:                                                                                  5'

- How did it feel when you weren't allowed in the circle?

- How did it feel when you had to stop your classmates from enetering the circle?

- When was it easier for you – when being in or out of the circle?

Notes

The role-playing game (activity 2) stimulates the understanding of children's right to life, liberty and personal security at a sensory level.

HR2_2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtUdWJZ__ms is a video clip created by the Council of Europe as a Creative Commons resourse to be used in schools.

Digital Resource

HR2_1 presentation yesii.eu/atividades/digital/2/HR2_1-associations.pps

HR2_2 - video www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtUdWJZ__ms


YESI 2023/02/03

36

yesi
3 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to opinion and expression
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     1 - Break the Circle

The teacher assigns randomly a number to each student, depending on the group size, i.e. for 20 students, numbers 1-4 are ok, so each group has 5 people (groups could be synthesized by the students with the same number, i.e. all having been assigned number ‘1’ or by students where each one has his/her own unique number 1-4; similarly and more fun is grouping by ingredient for a Greek salad, where every student is i.e. ‘tomato’, ‘cucumber’, ‘onion’, ‘oregano’, etc.) Once the groups have been formed, they make  circles and the teacher randomly picks a number (or an ingredient) to step out of the circle and try to break in, while the others remaining are instructed to not let go of their hands no matter what. This can be repeated once more with another number stepping out.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives

Students will become:

  •  familiar with their right to opinion and expression;
  • aware of their right to request and receive information in different ways and to participate in discussions about issues that concern them;
  •  aware that they can react if their right is violated.
Preparation

Suggested reading:

Required equipment: projector and laptop

Required materials: coloured pencils or markers, drawing paper

Digital resources: download the presentation before the lesson

Introduction

Children have the right to express their opinion. They should feel free to seek and receive information when it does not harm them or others. Adults must ensure that the child’s voice is heard when they want to share what they think or need. The child has the right to participate in discussing and decision-making concerning them. The child may require to be involved in situations when adults are sharing information relevant to them.

If this is your first activity from module "Human rights - Children's rights", first paly the introductory video to get students in the topic.                                                                                      5'

Methodology

NFE Tool (artistic work)

  1. Discussion: Ask students to share their experiences “Have you ever wanted to say something but the others wouldn’t hear you? What questions do you want the adults to ask you for your opinion and to listen to what you say?                                               5’ 
  2. Play the presentation. First, watch the entire presentation. Then comment on the individual moments in it of your choice, returning to specific photos that show different aspects of children's rights, for example:

- The right of children to receive information that relates to them - about how they will be treated, what nutrition guidelines they are given by specialists. Explain to children that adults should not scare children with the information - e.g. scare them with doctors, medical examinations, diets, etc., but explain to them what is happening in an understandable way.

- The right to choose their friends

- The right of children to come up with ideas

- The right to express an opinion and to share how they feel                                               15’

3. Have a short discussion about what children want to say to others if they are given the opportunity to be heard by more people.                                                                     5’

4.  Organize students individually or in groups to do their own project on the topic “My Dream” as set out in the final slide of the presentation. Let them feel free to choose how to express their dream. They can draw or write what they dream of and what they would like to say/ do in the world in the future. They can also express their idea with a dance or song. Organize presentations of all projects in class.                                                                                       20’     

Reflection

For reflection and a summary of the topic, ask the following questions:                               5'

- How did you feel when you presented your project and shared your dream?

- Is it good to be given the floor and and have others listen to you?

- Is your voice heard at home? Related to what questions?

- What about in school?

Notes
Digital Resource

HR3_1 - presentation yesii.eu/atividades/digital/3/HR3_1_EN.ppsx


YESI 2023/02/03

37

yesi
4 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to conscience and religion
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • Children are made aware of their right to choose what to believe in;
  • Children are made aware that they have the freedom to express their own religion and beliefs;
  • Children will realize that they have the right to practice the religion they desire without violating the same right of others.
Preparation

Required materials: markers or coloured pencils; cutouts from old magazines  

Required equipment: projector and laptop

Suggested reading:

Introduction

People are different not only in appearance. They like different things in the world around them, they believe in different things. Children, like adults, have the right to choose what to believe in. No one may prevent them from participating in different holidays and customs according to their religion. But they must also respect the right of others to believe in something of their choice.

If this is your first activity from module "Human rights - Children's rights", first play the introductory video to get students in the topic.                                                                         5'

Methodology

NFE Tools: discussion, group work, mind map

  1. Introduce students to the topic by asking the question "What does it mean to believe in something"?                                                                                5’
  2. Play the video in which different people share what they believe in.                         5’
  3. Ask students to share what they believe in - just like the participants in the video, no explanations needed. If they know people of different religions they can share what they have noticed - e.g. different foods, traditions and customs that people observe when celebrating religious holidays.                                                                             5’
  4. Divide the students into 5 groups. Distribute one handout to each group. Have students draw their own mind maps related to freedom of conscience and religion. In the blank spaces in the mind map they can add words, make small drawings (pictograms), paste cutouts from old magazines of their choice. When they are ready, one student per group has to present the results of the group work.                      20’
  5. Discuss with the class what it means to be free to choose what to believe in.             5’
Reflection

The lesson concludes with summarizing questions:                                                            5'

  • How will you feel if someone tells you what you should like?
  • Can anyone forbid us to believe in something?
  • Can we tell others what to believe in or who are they to believe in and trust?
Notes

The video https://www.youthforhumanrights.ie/course/lesson/articles-12-18/watch-human-right-18-freedom-of-thought.html was created by the nongovernment organization "United for Human Rights/Youth for Human Rights International" as a resource to be used in Active Citizenship training activities. 

Digital Resource

HR4 - video yesii.eu/atividades/videos/4_HR4-EN.mp4

HR4_2 - handout yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/4_HR4_2-handout-EN.pdf


YESI 2023/02/03

38

yesi
5 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to privacy
Developed by AENAO
Duration 50
Energizers yesi     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • To become aware of privacy and its importance
  • Students can consider ways to protect themselves and their privacy.
Preparation

Suggested Reading

CHILDRENS ONLINE PRIVACY AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION, pg 8

Materials

Printed HR5_diary

Introduction

According to Article 16 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child , the right to privacy is related to the the child’s self, family, home, correspondence, honour and reputation.  The child has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

There are many dimensions of privacy and how it can be exposed and / or protected. This exercise focuses on the protection of privacy online - which is a major issue of the recent years - and the protection of one’s privacy.

Methodology

NFE Tool  Case study, team work

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Children's Rights prior to the activity HR_Intro. (5')

  1. Teacher divides students in two groups and provides the Case study HR5_Diary. Both groups are requested to read Julia’s diary. The teacher explains that Julia is one of their classmates, she is their friend that they all know very well. Of course, now she is not present.

 The first group is assigned to respect Julia’s privacy, whereas the second group is asked not to respect her privacy. 

Tip: if students have difficulty understanding the difference between respecting and not respecting one’s privacy, then teacher briefly explains the following:

In group 1, students who find the diary respect that what is written is private. In group 2, the students do not care about exposing Julia to other classmates, because they do not care about privacy.                                       (10')

  1. Teacher asks the groups to think about their actions in regards to Julia’s diary. Once they decide what to do, they present to the plenary how they will proceed with Julia’s diary.      (10’)

  2. After reflection, teacher shows the video HR5 - Smart Tom and discuss with students the importance of privacy.        (5’)

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

  1. How was it to be part of your group? Was it easy for you to act as you care or you don’t care about Julia’s privacy?

  2. Do you think that privacy is important? Why?        (5')      

Notes

Optional: Teacher can play at the end of the session the following video to older class students (i.e. 11-12 year old students) and discuss about the risks of publishing personal details online

Amazing mind reader reveals his gift (5-10)

Digital Resource

HR1 - introduction 

Case study - Diary

Smart Tom - video


YESI 2023/02/03

39

yesi
6 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right of refugee children
Developed by AENAO
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     5 - Good morning or evening

Everybody walks around the room greeting each other (as if everybody was their close friends) using words and gestures (shake hand, kiss, hug). Then they repeat the greeting in silence using only their eyes. When the exercise is over, the teacher asks students how did they feel with the two different ways of greeting (eg was it difficult, how did they manage to communicate, etc).

Relaxing Exercises yesi     8 - Seasons of the year

All players sit in a circle, but not too close to one another. The teacher moves like a plant during the seasons of the year.

Winter: the plants are small, weak and are crunched together on the ground.

Spring: through the stronger sunshine, the plants grow slowly and slowly rise.

Summer: through the warm sun, the plants slowly open their arms, the flowers open their blooms are stand up straight.

Autumn: the sun rays become weaker. The plants begin to slowly shrivel, the blooms and leaves begin to fall away.

Objectives
  • To think about the situation of a refugee child

  • To identify the difficulties that such a child comes across

  • To discuss and propose options and alternatives for child refugees as to become integrated; hence to become like every other student.

Preparation
  • Suggested Reading

Refugee and migrant children in Europe

  • Materials

Whiteboard/blackboard, markers in different colours, big cartons/flipcharts

Introduction

According to Article 22 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, a child who is considered a refugee or seeking refugee status, whether accompanied or unaccompanied by a parent of another person, has the right to receive appropriate protection and humanitarian assistance.

Methodology

NFE Tool Brainstorming, team work, artistic creation

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Children's Rights prior to the activity HR_Intro.   (5')

  1. Students brainstorm about children who are seeking refugee status. Teacher asks them to think on the difficulties that a child refugee is facing not only when coming to a foreign country, but also when joining a new school.  (10’)

* Note: teacher should assist students to think about the following:

  • economical situation of the refugee
  • language barrier
  • psychological situation (including the negative possibility of facing if being unwanted)
  • physical appearance
  • family
  • cultural differences (different habits, same or different religion).
  1. Teacher categorises the written thoughts into 3-4 categories - depending on what students have brainstormed about. Examples of categories could be culture, psychology, economical aspect, appearance, etc. The teacher divides students in the corresponding number of groups; i.e. 4 categories = 4 groups.   (10’)           

  2. Each group makes a poster that corresponds to the main idea of the category; for example the group which corresponds to the category of economical aspect needs to make a poster that shows the current economic status of the refugee child.                 (15’)

  3. Students collect their posters and sit together in a circle so that they can discuss and reflect.  (5')

After reflection, teacher shows the video HR6 - Refugee Children. (5')

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

Do you think that these pictures represent also every student in this school? if not, what should be different?

Was it difficult to think about the situation of a refugee child?

(5’)  

Notes
Digital Resource

HR_Intro

HR6 - Refugee Children


YESI 2023/02/03

40

yesi
7 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The rights of disabled children
Developed by IPSantarém: Bento Cavadas | Ana Torres | Maurício
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     14 - I am going on a trip

Everyone sits in a circle. Start by saying “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug”, and hug the person to your right. That person then has to say “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug and a pat on the back”, and then give the person on their right a hug and a pat on the back. Each person repeats what has been said and adds a new action to the list. Go round the circle until everyone has had a turn.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives

Students will learn:

  • a mentally or physically disabled child should enjoy a full life;
  • a mentally or physically disabled child should be included in sports and play.
Preparation

Suggested pedagogical resources:

SDG Resources for educators | SDG 10 - Reduced inequalities

Convention of the Rights of the Child (Art. 23)

UNICEF | Child protection

Introduction

In Convention of the Rights of the Child, article 23 states the right do disabel children had a full and grateful life. They have the right to special care and assistance. States should provide education, training, health care services, rehabilitation services, preparation for employment and recreation opportunities adequate for disable children. 

The UNESCO SDG10 is dedicated to Reduce Inequalities. 

According to UNESCO', to achieve SDG10 specific objectives, the link between education and the reduction of inequalities should be explored. Students should learn to express views on why a particular inequality is negative and develop solutions for reversing this kind of situations, while respecting diversity and the choices of others.


Consider watch UNICEF Children's Rights video.

5'

Methodology

NFE Tool : Team work with discussion

  1. The teachers introduce the topic of children disabilities, emphasizing the importance that all children should have the same opportunities. 5’

  2. Organize the class in pairs of students. 5’

  3. Watch the vídeo Disability and Child Protection | UNICEF, Before watching the video, the teacher should inform students that they should take notes, after watching the video, about the situations related with the children with disbaility they observed, using the Support document for RH7. 10’

  4. In pairs, they should confront their notes and do a common resume of the movie. 5’

DT: video

Support document for RH7

Reflection

Teachers should promote a discussion with all students about the video content. Questions to be asked:

  1. What is the mood of the children with disability at the beginning of the movie? Why is he feeling like that?

  2. Do you think children with disability have the right to play with others? Think about what could you do to integrate children with disabilities of your one class on your plays.

  3. Is your school prepared to integrate children with disabilities (e.g. it has wheelchair ramps)?

5'

Notes

The Disability and Child Protection | UNICEF video does not need subtitles.

Digital Resource

Disability and Child Protection | UNICEF video

Game

UNICEF Children's Rights video.


YESI 2023/02/03

41

yesi
8 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to social care and health
Developed by AENAO
Duration 45
Energizers yesi     12 - Body spelling

Teacher asks students to write their name in the air using different parts of their body, for example with the hand/leg/elbow/nose.

Optional: If time allows teacher asks to the class to spell out some words reproducing the letters with their bodies. Students can collaborate all together or can create different groups.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     2 - Progressive muscle relaxation

To release tension from head to toe, students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each. The teacher guides the students; he/she asks them to start with the feet and toes, then move up to the knees, thighs, rumps, chest, arms, hands, neck, jaw, and eyes—all while maintaining deep, slow breaths.

Kelly Roper

Objectives

- Raise awareness that health is a fundamental human right.

- Become aware why access to social care and health is very important to everyone.

Preparation

- Suggested Reading

The Right to Health

- Materials

Printed Case Study HR8_The Story of Daisy

Introduction

Health is the state of physical, mental and social well-being and does not only mean an absence of illness or disease.

The right to health is closely linked to other fundamental human rights, most notably access to potable water and adequate hygiene.

The right to health includes access to health services.


According to Articles 24 & 26 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, every child has the right to access health care services and to benefit from social security - including social insurance.

Methodology

NFE Tool  Case Study, Team Work

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Children's Rights prior to the activity HR_Intro. (5')

1. Teacher divides students in two groups and provides the Case Study HR8_The Story of Daisy. Both groups are requested to read the case study and continue the story.      

Group 1: Daisy has access to social care and health. What can be done?Group 2: Daisy does not have access to social care and health. Are there any alternatives?   (10’)

2. Teacher asks students to think about Daisy and what would happen to her health condition, depending on the group that they are. Once they decide, they need to present their thoughts in the plenary.                                     (10’)

3. After reflection, teacher shows the video HR8 - Spiderman and discuss with students the importance of access to social care and health.        (5’)

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

- What do you think about the right to social care and health? Is it important?

- Was it difficult to find alternatives for someone like Daisy who does not have access to social care and health?                       (5’) 

Notes

-

Digital Resource

HR - Introduction

Case study - The story of Daisy

Spiderman - video


YESI 2023/02/03

42

yesi
9 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to education
Developed by IPSantarém: Bento Cavadas | Ana Torres | Maurício
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     12 - Body spelling

Teacher asks students to write their name in the air using different parts of their body, for example with the hand/leg/elbow/nose.

Optional: If time allows teacher asks to the class to spell out some words reproducing the letters with their bodies. Students can collaborate all together or can create different groups.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives

Students will learn:

  • that education is a fundamental human right and a basis for guaranteeing the realization of other rights.

  • there are inequalities concerning education in the world.

Preparation

Suggested pedagogical resources:

SDG Resources for educators | SDG4 - Quality education

https://en.unesco.org/themes/education/sdgs/material/04

Convention of the Rights of the Child

https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx

Introduction

In Convention of the Rights of the Child, the word “education” and derived words occur several times. The word “teaching” occurs only twice. It is important to distinguish teaching and education because human beings can learn without being taught. The articles 28 and 29 of that Convention have a focus on providing equal opportunities in education for all and in the global development of the child, with respect of childrens’ parents and context. The UNESCO SDG4 is dedicated to Quality Education and aims to ensure education for all. According UNESCO’ SDG4 specific objectives “include providing more opportunities for technical and vocational training to youth and adults so they can get better jobs; ending inequality in educational opportunities between men and women; providing the right education for children with disabilities, indigenous people and victims of conflict; improving school facilities to provide a safe and positive environment for everyone; increasing the number of trained and qualified teachers and promoting education for sustainable development”.


Consider watch UNICEF Children's Rights video

Methodology

NFE Tool : Team work with discussion

 Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Children's Rights prior to the activity HR_Intro.

  1. The teacher introduce the topic of education as a human right for all, emphasizing the importance of a quality education. 5’

  2. Organize the class in pairs of students. 5’

  3. Watch the vídeo 2 girls 2 lives, passed in Johannesburg, South Africa. Before watching the video, the teacher should inform students that the girls borned in the same day and they should take notes, after watching the video,  about the different opportunities for education of the two girls involved using the Support document for HR9. 10’

  4. In pairs, they should confront their notes and do a common resume of the movie. 5’

DT:

video

Support document for HR9

Game

Reflection

Teachers should promote a discussion with all students about the video content. Questions to be asked:

  1.  You can distinguish if one girl is going to have more access to education than the other one, at the beginning of the video?

  2. What is the first indicator that one girl is going to have more education opportunities than the other?

  3. What activities do they do during the day?

  4. When the girls return home after a day’ work, what do they do?

  5. Which girl had a son first?

  6. When the two girls meet together what were your thoughts?

  7. Which girl seems to live a happier life? 

  8. Why did education make a difference in the girls’ life?

 10’

Notes

The 2 girls 2 lives video does not need subtitles.

Digital Resource

2 girls 2 lives video

Game

 UNICEF Children's Rights video.


YESI 2023/02/03

43

yesi
10 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to rest and leisure, to play
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva | Ana Torres | Maurício D
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     13 - Body massage

The students stand in a circle: they need to follow all the movement the teacher does and massage themselves. The teacher starts to massage different parts of his/her body, starting from the head till the feet (it’s better if they take off their shoes). The teacher explains how the massage needs to be done, if delicate or more energetic.

Optional: The teacher can also ask to the students to massage another classmate.

Objectives
  1. Distinguish rest, leisure, play, competition and cooperation games;
  2. Experiment 1 cooperation game and 1 competition game;
  3. Reflect on these two types of games, which of these two types we prefer and why.
Preparation

Material: one large and resistant rope

Film on rope games: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSdVBXdVI98&t=90s

Competition game: Sea, Earth, Fire (Cf. movie at minute 0:22)

Cooperation game: Caught inside the rope (See movie at 1:13 minute).

Introduction

Children and youngsters have little time to play, given the demands of school schedules and tasks, and all kinds of after-school activities. However, the importance of play in their social, emotional and cognitive development is undeniable.

Playing can be fun and enjoyable in many ways, but they are also a privileged means of knowing and reflecting on different cultural forms, exploring the world and better getting to know oneself.

Traditional games represent and are associated with local cultures. However, there are universal playful patterns, the same traditional games being found in various regions, countries and corners of the world, although there may be differences in designations, rules and ways of playing.

5'

Methodology

NFE Tool (Brainstorming and games)

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Children's Rights prior to the activity HR_Intro.

  1. Sart with a brainstorming aiming at defining rest, leisure, play, game, competition and cooperation, and write down on a flipchart pad, board or file, the ideas organised below each term. 7' 

  2. Invite participants to play the 2 types of games described below: 1 competition game - Sea, Earth, Fire; and 1 cooperation game-Caught inside the rope.

Competition game: Sea, Earth, Fire 5'

The rope must be perched on the floor in line. Play this game during 5 minutes (indoors or outdoors).

Players line up along this line without stepping on it. At the beginning of the game, indicate which side of the line is the Sea and which is the Earth. The facilitator or a participant leads the group. The leader will say out loud the word "Sea", "Earth" or "Fire". If the leader says Sea, participants must jump with both feet to the side corresponding to the Sea. If the leader says Earth, they must jump to the side corresponding to Earth. If the leader says Fire, participants must have one foot on each side of the rope. The leader's commands do not follow any sequence. The same command can be given several times in a row. The leader tries to deceive players by saying several times the same command, by saying very different commands very quickly, by moving to the opposite side of the side where participants must jump, etc.

Whenever a player makes a mistake, jumping the wrong way, or staying on the same side, instead of jumping, he/she leaves the game.

Usually, the game ends when only one participant remains in the game, who will be the winner. In the specific activity, the winners are the participants who are still in the game at the end of 5'.

Cooperation game: Caught inside the rope 5'

Play this game during 5 minutes, indoors or outdoors. If you play it outdoors, you must draw a perimeter on the floor that players will not be allowed to cross. If it is played indoors, the room must have enough space for participants to run.

4 participants stand on the inside of the rope and stretch the rope at waist level, pulling to opposite sides so that it does not fall. They must keep the rope stretched. The rest of the participants are outside and will try not to get caught inside the rope.

Holding the rope in their hands, they will try to coordinate their movements in order to try to catch the rest of the participants, lifting the rope to trap them inside the rope.

3. After experimenting both games, participants answer a digital matching game with definitions of rest, leisure, play, competition game and cooperation game. 5'

Reflection

Ask the participants if they had already played these games and if they think that both cooperation and competition can contribute to rest, leisure and play, according to the ideas collected in the initial brainstorming.

5'

Notes
Digital Resource

Filme with rope games 

Digital game


YESI 2023/02/03

44

yesi
11 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to work
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 55
Energizers yesi     2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     15 - Moving like a toy

The teacher uses a magic word to change the students into many string-loaded (wind-up) toys. At the teacher’s signal, the toys start to move across the class, as many robots, to get their sits. They have to move more quickly at the beginning and then gradually more and more slowly, because their charge is finishing. Some of them will be frozen in the middle of the room, and the teacher has to give their cranks one more turn to help them reach their seats

Objectives
  • Children will be made aware of their right to be protected from socio-economic exploitation and work that poses a risk;
  • Children will learn to distinguish suitable work activities from work that may harm them;
  • Children will start to think about their right to oppose if they are forced to do something that harms them.
Preparation

Suggested reading:

Required equipment: projector and laptop

Required materials: printed voting cards HR11_2, scissors for the students to cut them on their own.

Digital resources: HR11_1, HR11_3 

Preparation: Print the voting cards from HR11_2 for each student.

You can also do the exercise by dividing the children into groups. Give each group one set of two cards.

Introduction

All people work. Children also work - they study, they help their parents in the family and this is very useful for them. However, sometimes it happens that children are forced to do hard work that can cause harm to them. States and adults protect children and do not allow they are induced to do something that is dangerous to them. Children also have the right to refuse to do hard and harmful work.

Students watch the introductory video of Children's Rights prior to the activity HR_Intro.           5'

Methodology

NFE Tools: Brainstorming, discussion.

 1. Play the video (HR11_3) and comment briefly why the lion's "employer" changes his attitude - Is the lion entitled to good working conditions at the circus? (NFE tool: discussion)                     5’

2. Ask students to think of the different activiities children do. Is this work? (NFE tool: brainstorming)    Record their answers on a flip chart or on the board in the classroom. After that, let them think and suggest, how you can group the activities children do. Examples:

a. Activities at school - study, tidy the classroom, etc.

b. Activities at home – household chores; taking care of a pet;

c . Working with adults - in the garden; related to cares for livestock, etc.                                  5’

3. Discuss with the students: When is it useful to work and what kind of work can harm children? Accept all ideas. Let everybody come up with an example or opinion.                                       5’

4. Use the photos in the video (HR11_1). Firstly, show photos from slides 2, 3, and 4. You will see examples of different activities that children do. States and adults make sure that children are protected from work that could harm them, and that they are paid fairly. As you explain this, let slide 5 stand on the screen.

Explain that children have the right to refuse to do work which is harmful for them, and have someone to protect them if they are forced to work: show slide 6.

Give an example with slide 7 - a job we have the right to refuse; and slide 8 - a job that children are good at. Explain that √ and x are the marks that indicate whether the images show acceptable jobs (√) or not (x). The signs are shown on slide 9.                                            15’

5. Hand out the two voting cards from HR11_2 to the students so that they have their cards on paper. Show them, one after the other, the pictures from slides 10, 11, 12, and 13 from HR11_1, and ask students to pick up one of the voting cards to indicate whether what they see in the picture is useful work or it can cause harm to children.                                                                        5’

Reflection

Ask the following questions and encourage children to share:                                                  5'

1. If you see other kids doing hard work, what will you think?

2. What will you do if you were forced to do hard or dangerous work?

3. Who can you turn to for help if the work you have to do makes you feel bad?

Notes
Digital Resource

HR11_1 video http://yesii.eu/atividades/digital/11/HR11_1.ppsx

HR11_2 - voting cards yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/11_HR11_2-handout.pdf

HR11_3 - video yesii.eu/atividades/videos/11_HR11_3.mp4


YESI 2023/02/03

45

yesi
12 yesiHuman Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to justice and law
Developed by IPSantarém - Bento Cavadas | Ana Torres | Maurício
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives

Students will learn:

  • the meaning of justice and injustice.

  • Distinguishing justice from injustice

Preparation

Suggested reading:

https://www.wvi.org/child-rights-and-equity/article/understanding-how-children-experience-injustice

Suggested video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6H1wfU0vkc

Legislation about inequalities in the access to health

https://ec.europa.eu/social/BlobServlet?docId=20339&langId=en

Introduction

The UNESCO SDG16 is dedicated to promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels 


According to UNESCO', at primary education, children are exposed  to the vast diversity of religious and ethnic identities, learners understand the need for mutual respect and understanding at the global level. To achieve SDG16, children have to learn how to differentiate justice from injustice.

Methodology

NFE Tool (Role play)

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Children's Rights prior to the activity HR_Intro.

 See the vídeo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6H1wfU0vkc

  1. The teacher puts a rope in the middle of the classroom and divides it into two. Students are split in the two spaces either randomly or by using a specific way of dividing the class in two groups. 5’

  2. The teacher gives stickers with a harmful bacteria (Support document for HR12) to all students and they have to put it on somebody else (everyone gets one harmful bacteria); 5’  

  3. In the third step, the teacher distributes medicines (pills) to both groups. However, one of the groups receives a good number of medicines, whereas the other one receives less medicines so thatsome of the students have no medicine (each pill can cure only one student). 5’

  4. The teacher asks the students to share their thoughts about the example of injustice. 5`

  5. Students play the game “Unjustice” 10´

  6. Studens watch the vídeo to see the reaction of other students who were involved in the practical situation of experiencing injustice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6H1wfU0vkc

Reflection

The teacher discusses with the students from both groups:

  • How did you feel when experiencing justice or injustice?
  • Can you provide practical examples of injustice?
  • What could be done to improve the situation?   
Notes
Digital Resource

Support document for HR12

Unjustice game


YESI 2023/02/03

46

yesi



Diversity and Social Inclusion

47

yesi
1 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Body diversity
Developed by AENAO
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     12 - Body spelling

Teacher asks students to write their name in the air using different parts of their body, for example with the hand/leg/elbow/nose.

Optional: If time allows teacher asks to the class to spell out some words reproducing the letters with their bodies. Students can collaborate all together or can create different groups.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     16 - Pass the face

It is like the game "telephone" but instead of passing a word or sentence around the group, participants pass a facial expression.
The group forms a circle with everyone having their eyes closed, except the person who is passing the "face" in the first place. The passer will tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him, that person will open her/his eyes to receive the face. She/He will then tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him and pass the face along. Once participants have passed the face they may keep their eyes open to watch it move around the group. At the end, the original passer receives the face from the last person in the group and then shows what the original face was.
 

Objectives

  • To raise awareness on the similarities / differences of the human body

  • To discover different abilities depending on different bodies.

Preparation
  • Materials

Large papers (i.e. flipcharts stuck together with paper tape or blue tack), markers, newspapers, magazines, scissors, glue.

Optional: old pieces of fabric/buttons, yarn

  • Tips

Collages can be stuck on the wall of the class or somewhere else in the school.

Introduction

We don’t shame flowers for being too big or too little, too short or too tall, too pink or too red, we just embrace them for their unique beauty… Why don’t we start doing that with ourselves?

Unknown

Methodology

NFE Tool Artistic creation (collage, drawing), team work, discussion.

NFE tool inspired by Compasito, “A Body of Knowledge”, pp 53-55

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro.   (5')

  1. Students are divided in groups of 5-6 and draw one body per group. Each body should be made by drawing a specific part, i.e. one student lies down and the group draws his/her head, then another student lies down and the group draws his/her arms, etc. This process is repeated until all students have lied down and a part of their body is drawn. When all bodies are drawn, they place the parts and the abilities/skills on them.Tip: Abilities/skills can include whatever a person can do with a specific part of the body. i.e. a person has a beautiful voice and uses mouth to sing (so students could draw/stick a musical note on the mouth), a person can play football and uses legs to play the sport (so students could draw/stick a football on the leg), etc. Abilities/skills can be placed/drawn/stuck using the materials.                                    (20’)

  2. Each group presents their collage with the different parts and different skills/abilities.                                                            (5’)

Optional: If there is time, the teacher can initiate  a conversation; they discuss all together on the ways that they can use these abilities and skills shown in the drawings according to everyone’s body dissimilarity/diversity. If something was different in their body, how could they adapt in order to have the abilities/skills shown in the drawings?          (10’)

        3. After reflection, teacher shows DSI1 - Everyday       Concerns    (5')

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

(a) Was it easy to find things you are able to do?

(b) Are there big differences between the collages?

(c) Do you think that everyone can have the same skills/abilities? Why?      (5’)

Notes

Teacher and Students can watch the following video (optional) at home - or if there is enough time after the completion of the activity: 

Ian - A movie for disability, non-discrimination and integration (5')

Digital Resource

DSI_Intro

DSI1 - Everyday       Concerns


YESI 2023/02/03

48

yesi
2 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Language / Country diversity
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     13 - Simon says

Teacher tells the group that they should follow instructions when he/she starts the instruction by saying “Simon says...”. If the teacher does not begin the instructions with the words “Simon says”, then the group should not follow the instructions! The teacher begins by saying something like “Simon says clap your hands” while clapping their hands. The participants follow. The teacher speeds up the actions, always saying “Simon says” first. After a short while, the “Simon says” is omitted. Those participants who do follow the instructions anyway are ‘out’ of the game. The game can be continued for as long as it remains fun.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     12 - Warm back

A piece of paper is stuck to each student’s back and they are given a pen. The paper is already prepared. Each piece of paper says: “I like………..”. Slow music is played and the students walk around and write characteristics about the person whom they like on the paper. Each child is allowed to look at the paper at the end and take it home.

Objectives
  • Understanding the idea of difference in terms of the different countries in which people live;
  • Understanding the difference by demonstrating the different languages used by people in different countries;
  • Showing that different people use the language differently;
  • Acceptance of the various ways in which people express themselves through the language of words and body language.
Preparation

Required equipment: laptop, loudspeakers

Digital tool: Presentation DSI2_1 and video clip DSI2_2

Introduction

There are different people around the world. They live in different countries - big and small; with mountains and seas. In some of them it is very cold and in others - it is warmer. This makes the world very interesting. People love to travel so that they get to know new countries. People around the world speak different languages. Apart from words, we also say different things with our body movements. Different people use the language differently - some people speak a lot, others are not so talkative. Through language we make friends and get along with others.

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro.                                                                                      5'

Methodology

NFE Tools: Brainstorming, work in pairs

  1. Use the presentation (DSI2_1) (slides 1,2 and 3) to show the differences between countries - in size, nature, etc.                                                                                       5’
  2. Have students list all the different countries they can think of or have visited (NFE tool – brainstorming).                                                                                                                5’
  3. Show slide 5 from the presentation and ask students to share if they know anything about these countries. Ask them what language is spoken in them, in their opinion. (NFE tool – brainstorming)                                                                                             5’
  4. Play the video from the presentation DSI2_1 (embedded in slide 6). Students will hear how people say “Hello” in different languages. This will give them an idea of other languages that they are not familiar with.                                                                       9’
  5. Ask pupils if they can say „Hello” in any other language apart from their mother tongue, or you may play the video DSI2_1 again. Choose a language students do not study at school and learn to say “Hello” in this language – by playing the video, or with the support of one of the students in the class.                                                                  10’
  6. Play the video from the presentation DSI2_1 (embedded in slide 8) to show students that some gestures and sound combinations are international; they are the same in the different countries and can be easily understood in all languages - e.g. “Hush”.            1’
  7. Play the video "Amazing things happen" (DSI2_2). Pupils will understand better that people are different and they use language differently. The video will help them accept the different ways in which others express themselves and feel empathy.            5'
Reflection

Discuss with your students the following questions:                                             5'

  • Do you know people who are taciturn or speak less than others? Does this hinder you from being friends with them?
  • How can we understand each other when we do not know the language other people speak?
  • Can we say something to others without sounds or words, only with our hands or our eyes?
Notes

The modified version of the CC videos have been used in the presentation DSI2_1.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DdkqOHDiLE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckIqE33RBtw 

Digital Resource

DSI2_1 - presentation yesii.eu/atividades/digital/18/DSI2_1_EN.ppsx

DSI2_2 - video yesii.eu/atividades/videos/18_Autism Eng.mp4


YESI 2023/02/03

49

yesi
3 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Cultural / Ethnic diversity
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva | Ana Torres | Maurício D
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     12 - Body spelling

Teacher asks students to write their name in the air using different parts of their body, for example with the hand/leg/elbow/nose.

Optional: If time allows teacher asks to the class to spell out some words reproducing the letters with their bodies. Students can collaborate all together or can create different groups.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives
  • Get to know lullabies from Yesi project partner countries;

  • Recognize that lullabies are a common cultural practice in Yesi partner countries and many other parts of the world;

  • Identify different cultural aspects specific to each country lullaby.

Preparation

Explore Lullabies of the World Project: a Russian animation project on the lullabies of different nations. The project created about a dozen music cartoons with a lullaby in native languages and plot  based on the content of the songs.

Portuguese Lullaby (3:06 min) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5rb3xEVa4U&list=PL1JPCVROsLh4E7zmzUGvuTDFikc_Lbsfl&index=21

Greek Lullaby (3:10 min) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAGpmSFobjY&list=PL1JPCVROsLh4E7zmzUGvuTDFikc_Lbsfl&index=20

Bulgarian Lullaby (3:09 min) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERcyvABn2zs&list=PL1JPCVROsLh4E7zmzUGvuTDFikc_Lbsfl&index=42

Serbian lullaby (2:22) It seems that this project did not  include a Serbian lullaby. The suggested serbian lullaby is the following: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3fdqj1P3Ns

Introduction

Lullabies are songs that are often accompanied by gestures and balancing movements, so they have both melodic and performative characteristics.

Through lullabies, the cultural heritage of a civilization or of one or more ethnic groups is transmitted from generation to generation: music, singing, gesture, poetry, contents and meanings of the lyrics, language, images about ways of living and thinking. These songs can have a very strong impact on children, not only on their psychological and physical well-being, but also on the initiation to a whole culture and feeling of belonging to that culture.

Although these songs are intended to calm the children and make them fall asleep, they sometimes contain references to distressing elements, such as a beast or a monster, but the singing voice is always reassuring and protective, in order to keep the beasts and monsters away from the children, to protect them from what may cause them fear, which is also an element of a culture.

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro.

Methodology

NFE Tool (lullabies case study and mind map)

  1. Ask the children if they know lullabies, songs that someone uses or used to sing for them to fall asleep. If some participant says yes, use that example to explain what is a lullaby. If not, use an well known  example of your country to explain that the use of lullabies in children's sleep routines exists in many countries. These songs strengthen the early relationship between the child and the mother, the father and / or other educators, and are often transmitted from generation to generation. Routines of making children fall asleep are part of the culture and ethnicity of the people: who makes children fall asleep, where do they fall asleep, how do they use lullabies (or not), who sings them (mom, dad, grandparents?) , etc. Lullabies transmit music, singing, gesture, lyrics, language, images about ways of living and thinking, and some lullabies also tell us about children’s fears. Not all ethnicities are afraid of the same things and each has its monsters and protective figures. Therefore, we should not be surprised by these differences, but try to understand them and live with the diversity of cultures that exist in our country and in other countries more or less distant. (5 minutes)

  1. Invite children to watch 2 films with lullabies from Yesi partner countries. By showing the location of the 4 countries on the world map, let participants choose 2 countries and remind them to pay attention to the differences between the two songs and images of the film. Depending on the group, if it takes too much time for the group to choose, the facilitator can choose but show the countries on the map (3 minutes). 

  1. Video-project the 2 films (7 minutes)

  1. Video-project the random wheel (digital resource below), using it to ask the participants to say (orally) the differences between the two lullabies and images associated with them in the films. (8 minutes). The analysis of this different artistic forms, people’s ways of living, places where they live, etc., is a concrete visual way of understanding the value of cultural / ethnic diversity.

Not all fields have to be filled in. It depends on the specific lullabies and what participants identified. If there is nothing to say in one category, turn the wheel again.

Reflection

The facilitator can ask the participants the following questions: 

  • What aspects of the 2 songs and films surprised you the most and why?

  • Would you like to get the link of the other 2 lullabies? Why? (5 minutes)

Notes

As an after activity suggestion, you can share with participants the link of all lullabies and suggest them to play with the random wheel. Or to use it for other games that they can invent themselves.

Digital Resource

Random wheel for identifying cultural/ethnic differences of the lullabies:

https://wordwall.net/pt/resource/2995586


YESI 2023/02/03

50

yesi
4 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Religious diversity
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Torres | Maurício D
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     20 - Chief of clan

Everyone stands in a circle. One participant closes his/her eyes or steps out of the room. He/She will have to guess who is the chief of the clan. One participant volunteers to be the secret Chief (quietly, so the "guesser" can't hear anything). The chief begins an action such as snapping fingers, patting the tummy, or slapping knees, and everyone in the circle imitates him/her.  The guesser returns to the room and tries to figure out who the chief is. As the guesser looks around, the chief changes the action avoiding being detected.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     14 - Give me your energy

The students stand in a circle. The teacher starts, pretending he/she is holding a ball on the hands and passing it to the student on his/her right; this one do the same, until the ball comes back to the teacher. The ball needs to be passed in a gentle way, as it is very precious. At the second round, the teacher passes the ball to students in another side of the circle, making a gesture and a noise. The students will do the same until everyone will have touched the ball at least once.  The ball can be passed in any way (in form of kick, kiss…), pretending it becomes bigger or smaller depending on the will of the students. 

Objectives
  • Discover the diversity of religions that exist in the world;

  • Analyze the differences and similarities between religions.

Preparation

Reading suggestions 

Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief, articles 1-3 and 6: https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html (UN, 2016)

European Convention on Human Rights, pages 10-12 and 48: http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf (Europe, 2016)

Arda Religion Dictionary: http://www.thearda.com/learningcenter/religiondictionary.asp (ARDA, 2016)

Presentation: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1MXv5FPaoDCWhbgJXKmNGlUK4Esbx5s1A7TwS6lmULEE/edit?usp=sharing 

Introduction

The religious diversity is represented by the wide variety of religions present throughout the world.

In this perspective, millions of people worship different gods (with different moral teachings), which represents the manifestation of freedom of religious expression.

In practice, religious diversity is seen when we find different religious temples (with different beliefs) in a given city.

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro.

Methodology

NFE Tool  Gamification

  1. The facilitator ask the students to connect images with different religions in the game as a way of descovering what they know about religions. 5´

  2. The facilitator show the presentation with  the definition of the religions to the studentes. 10`

  3. After the presentation, students will be asked to conect informations with the religions in another game. 5´

Reflection

The facilitator ask the students:

  • Did you know all the religions that were spoken at the presentation?

  • What is your opinion about the religions covered?

  • Do you know anyone from other religions? If so, what are these religions?

  • Do you know the customs / characteristics of other religions?

  • Have you ever thought about changing your religion? If so, why?

  • Do you think it is important to address this topic in the school context? 7`

Notes
Digital Resource

game 

presentation

2 game


YESI 2023/02/03

51

yesi
5 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Gender diversity (Man vs Woman)
Developed by AENAO
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     3 - Amoeba

An evolution game! Everyone starts off as an amoeba, with the purpose of evolving to a human. All students walk around acting like an amoeba and when they meet with another amoeba, they play one round of rock/paper/scissors. Whoever wins evolves into a worm. When two worms meet they play again rock/paper/scissors and whoever wins turns into a wasp, but whoever loses goes back to becoming an amoeba. This continues until one becomes human. The evolution stages are: amoeba à worm à wasp à chicken à monkey à human.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives

  • Acknowledge similarities and differences between the two genders

  • Investigate how this diverse characteristics can lead to similarities and/or differences among the genders.

Preparation

  • Suggested Reading

Gender - WHO

  • Materials

Big carton papers/flipchart papers, markers

Introduction

Gender diversity is equitable or fair representation of people of different genders. Gender diversity is often related to Gender equity, since the latter refers to the justice in the distribution of benefits and responsibilities between women and men.

It’s time that we all see Gender as a spectrum instead of two sets of opposing ideals.

Emma Watson

Methodology

NFE Tool Team work, artistic creation

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro.   (5')

  1. Teacher divides students in 2 groups; boys and girls. If the groups are too big, teacher can split them into smaller ones (i.e. a group of 20 students can be split into 4 smaller groups; 2 groups of girls, 2 groups of boys). Each group is given the same task; they need to draw on a big carton sheet a person of their gender (i.e. boys’ group draw a man, girls’ group draw a woman). Students are encouraged to draw this person as detailed as possible. (15’)

  2. Once their drawings are ready, teacher asks students to think about their skills and professions. Some examples could be:

  • Is a man strong and brave enough to be a fireman? What about a woman; could she be a firewoman too? 

  • Could a woman or a man be caring and sensitive to become a nurse?  

Students need to write these skills on their drawings.   (10’)

* Teacher at this point should not encourage students to lead to a certain direction in regards to a man’s or a woman’s skills. 

  1. Once the posters are ready, the groups exchange them, so that the boys group has the poster from the girls group and vise versa. Each group observes and comments their poster to the plenary (for eg do girls agree about the boys’ poster? Could a woman be a strong candidate for the skills shown in the boys’ poster?)             (5’)

  2. After reflection, students can do the game DSI5 - Re-arrangements. The game can be done in class (shown by the teacher in a projector, or can be done individually by every student).  (10’)

For further explanations, kindly see “Notes” below.

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

(a) Did you find similarities within the two genders?

(b) Did you find differences within the two genders?

(c) Could a difference be overcome so that it becomes a similarity?    (5’)

Notes

In Step 4 of the methodology, the teacher should advice students that  whatever characteristic they have chosen is fine. Teacher should also mention that students could try to imagine the story in the background and should explain how all characteristics match nearly every person depicted. Some examples are:

  • the crying man (which depicts a specific moment in his life) is athletic because he  practices football 3 times per week,

  • the waitress is very clever and can do complicated math without pen & paper - she has found a clever way to provide a better service, 

  • a mother could be hard-working, professional, educated, athletic, clever, etc while being a caring parent as well. 

The whole point is to give alternative narratives to pre-existing gender roles.

The teacher could also engage in a brief conversation in the plenary, asking i.e. “Was there a characteristic that you thought matched in many people or a characteristic that you found it difficult to match to a person? Or was there a person you found it difficult to match with a characteristic?”

As a conclusion, the teacher could emphasize to the students that they could be anything, no matter their gender or pre-defined gender role.

Digital Resource

DSI_Intro

DSI5 - Re-arrangements


YESI 2023/02/03

52

yesi
6 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Diversity at school
Developed by IPSantarém - Bento Cavadas | Ana Torres | Maurício
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives

Students will learn:

  • the importance of every child having the opportunity to attend school;

  • that diversity of gender, race, age, religion, tec. at school is an opportunity to share and learn about different life experiences.

Preparation

Suggested reading:

UNESCO SDG4-Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

Introduction

In Convention of the Rights of the Child, article 38 recognizes the right of the child to education. With the same goals, UNESCO SDG4 aims, by 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes. The UNESCO SDG4 approaches the diversity at school with the aim, by 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations.

Methodology

NFE Tool ( Brainstorming, tema work)

  1. Teacher should divide the class in small groups of three or four students with different gender, race, religion, etc. 5’

  2. In each group, the students have to look at the class pictures in this Support document D6 and play the game 10´

Teacher should ask each group which conclusions they have achieved and discuss what they have in common and what they have different. 5’

Reflection

Teacher reflect with the studens about:

  1. Why is it so important to have diversity of different children at school?

  2. What can we learn with each other?

Notes
Digital Resource

Support document D6

game


YESI 2023/02/03

53

yesi
7 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Age diversity
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     10 - Mountain range

Stand side by side in a line, in mountain pose, your feet hip-width apart.  Each foot must touch the foot of the person on each side. Walk (as a group) across the room without separating their feet from your partner’s.
If the group comes apart, you must begin again.

Variation: Ask the students to walk on their toes.

Objectives
  • To show different aspects of the differences during different ages of a person's life and growth;
  • To be aware that differences between generations have advantages and may be useful;
  •  To understand the value of communication between people of different generations.
Preparation

Preparation:

  • Handout DSI7_2 – printed for each small group of 3 students

Required equipment: laptop and projector

Digital tool: video DSI7_1 

Introduction

People differ not only in appearance, origin, character and qualities, but also in age. Communicating with people of different ages can sometimes be difficult for us, because each generation has its own preferred ways of expressing and receiving information. On the other hand, intergenerational communication has many benefits - we share experiences, children can learn interesting things about the past, and adults can master modern technologies with the support of their children and grandchildren.

Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro5'

Methodology

NFE Tools: discussion, role play, team work.

  1. Ask students to bring photos when they were small. Get them in the topic by asking questions related to them in the past and in the future: Look at the pictures when you were small. What has changed since that time? What changes happen with us as we grow up? Now, imagine you are 30 years old. How will you look like?                          5'
  2. Use the video to show and comment on the differences between people considering age.                                                                                                                             5’
  3.  Divide the class in 3 groups: group A – students; group B – parents; group C – grandparents. Distribute the handout to each group.Complete step 1 from the handout.                                                                                                                       5'
  4. Make small groups of 3 having one representative from groups A, B and C in each small group. Distribute the handout to each small group. The small groups have the task to play a short sketch presenting a dialogue between the representatives of the different generations in a family. Follow the two steps from the handout to plan the dialogues and have the groups play their sketches in front of the class. (NFE tool – role play).                                                                                                                    20'
  5. After watching all the sketches, discuss as a class the ideas that came up:               5'   
  • What can children teach adults?
  • What can adults teach children?
  • How do adults prefer to communicate?
  • How do children prefer to communicate?
  • How can family members get along with one other better?                                     
Reflection

Discuss the following questions to help students understand the topic:                                 5'

  • What do you find most interesting to talk about with adults?
  • How do you prefer to communicate with your friends - over the phone, through messages, to talk to each other when you are together or something else?
  • Why is it important for us to communicate not only with peers but also with older people?
Notes

At the discretion of the teacher and the size of the group, activity 4 can be realized by discussions in pairs or in small groups instead of the suggested role play.

Digital Resource

DSI7_1 - video yesii.eu/atividades/digital/23/DSI7_1.ppsx

DSI7_2 - handout http://yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/23_DSI7_2.pdf


YESI 2023/02/03

54

yesi
8 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Diversity and stereotypes
Developed by AENAO
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     20 - Holding legs

Participants work in pairs. And you can put a quiet and relaxing music (or sounds like water falling down, sea waves, etc.). 

Half of the participants are asked to lie down face up, eyes closed, with their left leg extended on the floor and their right leg elevated. Another participant stands up and loops a towel around the heel of the other’s right foot and holds the ends of the towel in his/her hands, and makes soft and gentle movements (upwards and downwards, and sidewards) while the other totally relaxes his/her leg. Then they repeat the same process with the left leg. Then the participants switch roles.

Objectives

  • To become aware of the term stereotype.

  • To get familiar with different examples of stereotypes AND with the unprejudiced option of these examples.

Preparation

  • Suggested Reading

Stereotype development and formation, pgs 548-549

Stereotype defined

  • Materials

Printed version of DSI8_Cards

  • Tips

The cards given in DSI8_Cards are divided in 3 sets as follows:

  • First set of cards includes a word or phrase (slides No 2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 17, 20, 23, 26)

  • Second set of cards includes the description of the words/phrases with the stereotype. These are the cards that are shown right after the slides of the first set: (slides No 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27)

  • Third set of cards includes the description of the first set without the stereotype - it is the alternative option of the definition which allows students to think about the given words/phrases free of stereotypes. These are the remaining cards (slides No 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28).

Introduction

By definition, a stereotype is an idea or belief that many people have about a thing or group of people. This idea or belief is based upon how they look on the outside, which may be untrue or only partly true. 

Types of stereotypes in society include gender, race, religion, culture, age and profession. 

Methodology

NFE Tool Game, Team work

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro.   (5')

  1. Teacher introduces the term stereotype and explains briefly how this is related to society       (5’)

  2. Students are divided in 3 groups. Each group gets a set of cards from DSI8_Cards (See Tips):

  • Group A gets the first set of cards with the word or phrase.

  • Group B gets the second set of cards with the description WITH the stereotype.

  • Group C gets the third set of cards with the description WITHOUT the stereotype. (5’)

  1. Groups play one at a time. Group A can begin, then group B, then group C. Group A shows a card. Groups B and C need to discuss together in their own teams and to reveal their card that corresponds to the card that group A has shown. Of course, the teacher is the one who allows each group to speak. For example, if Group A shows the card with the word BALLET (which is given in slide 2), Group B needs to find the description in slide 3 and Group C needs to find the description in slide 4. Then, on the second round, Group B can begin the game by showing a card (for eg card No 6). So now Groups A and C need to find the cards 5 and 7 respectively.Then, on the next round, group C can start the game by showing a card.

Groups that find a card win 1 point, whereas groups who don’t find a card do not win any points.                                                      (15’)

  1. When the game is finished, the groups can discuss with the teacher the descriptions of the words/phrases with and without the stereotypes. If possible, students can share their own examples that are related to the words/phrases and the corresponding description.     (10’)

After reflection, teacher shows the DSI8 - Walter the Wolf.   (5')

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

(a) Was it easy to relate words/phrases with the descriptions? 

(b) Was it easier to identify the description when there is a stereotype or not?      (5’)  

Notes

Teacher and Students can watch the following video (optional) at home - or if there is enough time after the completion of the activity: 

Lambs - A movie for difference and acceptance   (5')

Digital Resource

DSI_Intro

DSI8_Cards

DSI8 - Walter the Wolf


YESI 2023/02/03

55

yesi
9 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Diversity in abilities_ Ability and disability_social inclusion
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana da Silva| Bento Cavadas| Ana Torre
Duration 55
Energizers yesi     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     11 - Breathing exercise

Teacher asks students to make a circle and do the following exercises, repeating each one few times and alternate them. Teacher can also add new ones.

Breathing in raise your arms above your head and say “Elevator Up!”  Breathing out, float your arms back down to your sides, saying “Elevator Down.”  Repeat.

Take three quick breaths in while wiggling your nose.  Wiggle your nose on each breath in.  Then wiggle your nose on each breath out.

Hold your hand in front of your nose and hiss hiss hiss while breathing out.

Objectives
  1. Reflect on what is an ability and a disability;

  2. Experience a disability;

  3. Experience how we are able to do things in spite of our limitations.

Preparation
  1. paper with word: “blindfold” 
  2. role="presentation">paper with the sentence: “watch and help when asked”
  3. 5 papers identifying an element of a city: a car, a house, a tree, a person and a bridge. see document
  4. Legos

  5. blindfolds
Introduction

We all have a role to play in building an inclusive community.

Inclusion is the right of all individuals to participate, in a conscious and responsible way, in the society of which they are a part, and to be accepted and respected in what differentiates them from others.

Methodology

NFE Tool: Role play

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro.

  1. The facilitator starts by showing the vídeo and asks the participants about their perception of the story.   5´
  2. The facilitator divides the class into two groups. Half of the participants receive “blindfold” paper notes (they will step in the shoes of blind people), and the other half get “watch and help when asked” notes – this is the group of the Helpers.    3´
  3. The facilitator splits the participants in 5 new groups. Half of the students in each group are blind, and the rest are Helpers.  After the formation of the groups, they receive a printout of one element of a city: a car, a house, a tree, a person and a bridge. see document   3´ 
  4. The Helpers help the students who will step in the shoes of blind people to put on their blindfolds. The task of each group is to construct the element from the printout they have received with the Lego pieces. It is only the ‘blind’ students who can do the construction. The Helpers can support then when they are asked to help. The Helpers cannot touch the Lego pieces; they support the ‘blind ‘students only through speech instructions.   12´
  5. The groups put their constructions together on a large empty space (a desk or on the floor) – this is the city they have built together.  2'
Reflection

The facilitator asks the participants:

  1. The ones with the blindfold on - how did you feel without being able to see what you were doing?

  2. Those who were helping - how did you feel?

  3. Did you like the built object?

  4. The objects all together make a city, are you satisfied with the city you built?

Notes
Digital Resource

vídeo


YESI 2023/02/03

56

yesi
10 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Social inclusion: My Dream Classroom
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     5 - Good morning or evening

Everybody walks around the room greeting each other (as if everybody was their close friends) using words and gestures (shake hand, kiss, hug). Then they repeat the greeting in silence using only their eyes. When the exercise is over, the teacher asks students how did they feel with the two different ways of greeting (eg was it difficult, how did they manage to communicate, etc).

Relaxing Exercises yesi     16 - Pass the face

It is like the game "telephone" but instead of passing a word or sentence around the group, participants pass a facial expression.
The group forms a circle with everyone having their eyes closed, except the person who is passing the "face" in the first place. The passer will tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him, that person will open her/his eyes to receive the face. She/He will then tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him and pass the face along. Once participants have passed the face they may keep their eyes open to watch it move around the group. At the end, the original passer receives the face from the last person in the group and then shows what the original face was.
 

Objectives

Students will:

  • Get deeper in the topic of social inclusion;
  • Think about inclusion in their small community;
  • Come to the conclusion that social inclusion is beneficial for all;
  • Learn to plan actions to create an inclusive environment in their classroom and school.
Preparation

Materials:  large cardboards or flipchart paper, felt tips and colored pencils – for the posters in activity 3

Introduction

We usually think it is not our responsibility and often blame the others when we see children who are unhappy, not being involved in the life of the community or even depressed. We consider we cannot do anything about that because this is life, and this is society. But WE ARE SOCIETY, we can make a difference with our actions. Maybe not a big difference, but our small steps can make someone happy; they can change lives.

Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activities. (DSI_Intro)                                                                                     5'

Methodology

NFE Tool: team work, discussion, artistic work.

  1.  Students are asked to imagine their dream classroom in which everyone is included. They are divided in 3 groups with the task to think about changing the following aspects of school/ class life so that all students are socially included:                    10’
  • Group 1: the environment, e.g. can anything be changed in the school yard, in the school building or in the classroom so that all students are included? Maybe some changes because of students with disabilities, or because there are students who like playing specific games but they are not available/possible to play because of restriction of the environment, etc.
  • Group 2: new class activities, e.g. organizing different games during breaks so that everybody is involved (games for students who like physical activities and games related to speech), or having a support team during breaks with the task to make sure all students are happy and have someone to talk to or play with, etc.
  • Group 3: think about what makes you (and other students) unhappy and excluded and come up with ideas how this could be changed, e.g. make a list of rules for everybody to keep to and have all students put their names bellow it as confirmation that they will keep the rules, or start a ‘kindness’ campaign/week in which students pay special attention to the way they behave to their classmates and make sure no one is left behind, etc.
  1. Each group plans what they, personally, could do to have this dream come true.     10’    
  2. Each group is provided with large cardboard or flipchart paper and markers to presents their ideas from activity 2 on a poster, or they could choose to present their ideas orally – to talk about them, or act them.                                                           10’
  3. The groups present the outcomes of their collaborative work to the plenary.            10’
Reflection

As a final wrap-up of the training students could discuss to implement some of the ideas presented by groups 1, 2 1and 3 in order to have a more inclusive classroom. If they agree that some of the suggestions are good and realistic for implementation, they could plan the practical steps, set up the timing, etc.                                                                                              5’

Notes
Digital Resource

YESI 2023/02/03

57

yesi
10 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Socioeconomic diversity and social inclusion
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     15 - Animal roundup

The teacher tells to the class to silently think of an animal. Then he/she tells to the group that without talking, they need to arrange themselves on a line from largest to smallest animals. Group members can only make gestures and the noise of their animal. After they have finished, teacher ask to the students to say the animal they were supposed to be to see if the order is correct.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     10 - Mountain range

Stand side by side in a line, in mountain pose, your feet hip-width apart.  Each foot must touch the foot of the person on each side. Walk (as a group) across the room without separating their feet from your partner’s.
If the group comes apart, you must begin again.

Variation: Ask the students to walk on their toes.

Objectives

Students will:

  • Get the idea of what social inclusion is;
  • Think about exclusion in their small community.
Preparation

Preparation:

Required equipment: Laptop and projector for activity 1 (for watching the presentation)

Introduction

We are all different, even within our own cultures. Quite often, we reject and are suspicious of people who are different. We feel safer when communicating with people who physically and mentally look like us.

But this is the easy way. We are missing a lot – life would be much more colourful and interesting if we embrace diversity and value it as an asset. We will be happier if we live in a community where everybody feels safe, accepted and appreciated.

Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activities. ( DSI_Intro)                                                                                  5'

Methodology

NFE Tools: discussion, team work, snow balling.

  1. Students watch the interactive presentation, discuss with the teacher the statements and the images, and indicate their opinion (by putting up the cards  √ or x ) regarding the questions posed in the video in order to get into the topic of excluding the different ones in society. The teacher helps them see the difference between accepting everybody as a human being and doing a favor for the “other ones” when we accept them (with the latter not being social inclusion).                                                   10’       
  2. Students are presented to the task of thinking up stories about social exclusion in specific situations. The teacher shows them the setting and characters in Story 1 (DSI10.1_2) on the big screen and asks if they have ever witnessed or participated in a similar situation about social exclusion, and starts a discussion what might happen in the Story 1. The discussion continues with cases linked to social exclusion students have witnessed or heard about. (NFE tool: snowballing)                                   10’                           
  3. The teacher presents one possible plot of Story1 (presenting social exclusion) DSI10.1_3                                                                                                         5’
  4. Students get the task of coming up with ideas about changing the plot so that at the end of the story the two girls start playing together (so the plot is changed to be about social inclusion) (NFE tool : snow balling)                                                           10'     
  5. The teacher presents one possible plot of Story1 (presenting social inclusion) DSI10.1_4.    5'                         
Reflection

As a close-up of the training, students could be encouraged to share the most valuable aspects of the activity; the most interesting ones; most surprising part of the activity, etc.               5'

Notes

Follow-up: This training is linked to lesson 10.2: Social Inclusion: My Dream Classroom

Digital Resource

DSI10_1 - interactive presentation 

Voting cards - yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/11_HR11_2-handout.pdf 

Worksheets: DSI10.1_2, DSI10.1_3, DSI10.1_4


YESI 2023/02/03

58

yesi
11 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Bullying and social inclusion
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     1 - Break the Circle

The teacher assigns randomly a number to each student, depending on the group size, i.e. for 20 students, numbers 1-4 are ok, so each group has 5 people (groups could be synthesized by the students with the same number, i.e. all having been assigned number ‘1’ or by students where each one has his/her own unique number 1-4; similarly and more fun is grouping by ingredient for a Greek salad, where every student is i.e. ‘tomato’, ‘cucumber’, ‘onion’, ‘oregano’, etc.) Once the groups have been formed, they make  circles and the teacher randomly picks a number (or an ingredient) to step out of the circle and try to break in, while the others remaining are instructed to not let go of their hands no matter what. This can be repeated once more with another number stepping out.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives

Students will:

  • Learn what bullying is;
  • Learn to distinguish the 4 basic types of bullying;
  • Get to know themselves better and build their self-esteem;
  • Get to know a simple 4-step strategy to counteract bullying.
Preparation

Preparation: print handout DSI11_2 for each student:

  • On handout 2.1 there are two big hearts. They have to be cut in advance and glued together. After that a long string is to be glued to the two-sided heart so that it would hang loosely on the students’ backs (see illustration on the worksheet);
  • Handouts 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4 are to be printed and delivered to students in activity 2.

Equipment: laptop and projector for activity 1 (DSI11_1)

Introduction

Bullying is a major problem that affects both kids and adults, yes, adults too. Many of us have had to deal with bullies at some point in life, perhaps as children or maybe in adulthood. But although bullying is common, no one needs to put up with a bully’s behavior. Taking power from a bully is not always easy, but there are wise ways to deal with them.

Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activities. (DSI_Intro)                                                                                  5'

Methodology

NFE tools: discussion (act. 1), artistic work/ drama (act. 2, steps 2, 3)

  1. Students get into the topic of bullying by watching the presentation (DSI11_1)  and discuss the different types of bullying.                                                                      5’
  2. How to counteract bullying in 4 steps:

Step 1: Self-esteem                                                                                                     15’

If you have been bullied, remember that this isn’t your fault! There are many reasons why bullies do what they do; but they have little to do with you and a lot to do with the bullies’ personal issues. So, don’t start viewing yourself through the bullies’ eyes. This is not your real portrait.

Activity 2.1.1. Students receive copies of the big heart from handout 2.1. and find the side entitled ME-ME. Instruct them to write down all the great qualities that make them unique – maybe they have good grades in Maths or PE, or play a musical instrument, or tell interesting stories to their grandmother and make her laugh, etc.

Activity 2.1.2. When they are ready with the ME-ME side, they hang the hearts on their back facing down (the ME-ME side faces their backs) and start walking round the classroom. Whenever the meet someone, they write a good quality of the person on his heart (OTHERS-ME side) and continue walking around.

Activity 2.1.3. Wrap-up: Students read the OTHERS-ME side of their hearts. All the qualities on the two sides – this is who they really are. The next time a bully makes them feel miserable, they can remember this amazing collection of positive traits and talents.

Step 2: Back-up team                                                                                                    5’

Students receive a printed copy of the 2.2. handout  (pages 4-5) and are instructed to keep it and think it over at home. In class you read and act a plot illustrating the step (students are divided in groups of 4 and are asked to come up with a simple plot illustrating the possible benefits (or drawbacks) of step 2.               

Step 3: Ignore and get out of the situation                                                                           5’

 Similarly, students receive a printed copy of the 2.3. handout (page 6); they keep it as food for thought at home. In class you read step 3 and students (in the same groups of step 2) act a plot illustrating it.                                                       

Step 4: Talk to someone.                                                                                                        5’

Students receive a printed copy of the 2.4. handout (page 7) and keep it so that they can think it over at home. In class you read step 4 together and discuss practical things as uggested, e.g. the name of the guidance counselor in school and how students can contact her/him; other teachers in school who can help; the national hotline they can call, etc.             

Reflection

Guided reflection – suggested activities and questions:                                                       10'                        

  • How did you feel during the training? Students go to one of the spaces marked with the feeling which represents best their overall emotion regarding the training activity as a whole: 1. Interested ; 2. Content; 3. Confused; 4. Surprised; 5. Excited; 6. Happy; 7. Embarrassed; 8. Nervous. When students split in the groups, they share in their group why they have chosen this feeling. After that a representative of the group reports to the other groups the why the students from his group have chosen the corresponding feeling.  (Flashcards with emotions: handout 2.5)
  • What new things did you learn? (related to bullying or not)
  • How can you make use of what you have learned in the training?
Notes
Digital Resource

DSI11_1 - presentation yesii.eu/atividades/digital/27/DSI11_1.ppsx

Handouts 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5 yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/27_DSI11_2_handouts 2.1_2.2_2.3_2.4_2.5.pdf


YESI 2023/02/03

59

yesi
12 yesiDiversity and Social Inclusion / Racism_social inclusion
Developed by AENAO
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     14 - I am going on a trip

Everyone sits in a circle. Start by saying “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug”, and hug the person to your right. That person then has to say “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug and a pat on the back”, and then give the person on their right a hug and a pat on the back. Each person repeats what has been said and adds a new action to the list. Go round the circle until everyone has had a turn.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Objectives

  • To become aware on different kinds of people.

  • To realise that diversity exists everywhere, even in our classroom.

  • To reflect on our reactions towards a new person.

Preparation
  • Suggested Reading

Inclusive Education - COE

  • Materials

Printed Case Studies given at DSI12_Case Study_1,2,3,4

Introduction

“There is nothing more unequal than equal treatment of inequality”

Aristotle

Methodology

NFE Tool Case Study, Discussion in plenary, Discussion in groups

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Diversity and Social Inclusion prior to the activity DSI_Intro.   (5')

  1. Teacher divides students in 4 groups. Each member of the group is to be given individually the respective Case Study which is given at the DSI12_Case Study_1,2,3,4. All students need to read carefully their own Case Study and think about the question asked.       (5’)

  2. Students - one by one - present to the plenary their decision. All students need to speak at this stage about their decision.                    (10’)

  3. Students discuss in their groups their own decisions. Teacher now introduces a new question for all of them: “Why did you make that choice?” . Students need to include all decisions;  if there are students who answered “YES” to the question of the Case Study, they need to justify their answer. Similarly, if  there are students who answered “NO” to the question of the Case Study, they also need to justify their answer.     (5’)

  4. Groups now present to the plenary the outcomes of their discussion. Each group presents all decisions and the corresponding reasons.         (10’)

After reflection teacher shows DSI12 - Fruit Salad.   (5')

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

(a) Was it easy for you to decide on the question given in the Case Study?

(b) Would you decide something differently, now that you are aware of your classmates’ decisions?  (5')

Notes

Teacher and Students can watch the following videos (optional) at home - or if there is enough time after the completion of the activity: 

Ian - A movie for disability, non-discrimination and integration

Birds - A movie for diversity and bullying   (5')

Digital Resource

DSI_Intro

DSI12_Case Study_1,2,3,4

DSI12 - Fruit Salad


YESI 2023/02/03

60

yesi



Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement

61

yesi
1 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / My identities
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 45
Energizers yesi     9 - Balloon pop

Have everyone form a circle. Instruct the participants to put one piece of information about themselves, e.g. I have 2 sisters, or my mother is called Samy,  on a small slip of paper, fold it, and put it in a blown up balloon. Throw the balloons in the middle of the circle and then have people take turns popping a balloon, reading the piece of paper, and guessing to whom the information applies. Participants could wander round the room asking ‘yes/ no’ questions to the other participants but not exactly the statement from the paper slip, e.g. they cannot ask “Have you got 2 sisters? But could ask “Have you got sisters?” and then “Have you got more than 1 sister?’, “Have got less than 3 sisters?”, etc. Game finishes when all participants have identified the author of the paper slip they have.

*Note: this exercise should be used if there is enough time.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives
  • To understand the idea of identity.
  • To understand the difference between personal identity (the characteristics that make you different from others), and social identity (the characteristics you share with other people in as being part of society).
  • To understand the variety of factors building the identity.
  • To learn more about your own identity.
  • To find classmates with similar interests/characteristics.
  • To accept other people’s identities.
Preparation

Preparation:

  • Print the posters IAC1_1 on A4 size paper and stick them on the walls of the classroom.

Required materials: sticky tape

Required equipment: laptop, projector, loudspeakers for the video (step 4)

Introduction

A person's identity is composed of both an 'I' and a 'we'. The 'I' finds itself in love, work, and pleasure, but it also locates itself within some meaningful group identity - a tribe, a community, a 'we.'

Students watch the introductory video for module "Active Citizenship and Social Involvement".     5'

Methodology
  1. Guess the true/false characteristics of my identity (NFE tool: game). Each pupil comes up with 3 characteristics of his/her identity – 2 of them should be true, and one of them should be false. Pupils come to the front and tell the class the three identity features they have come up with about themselves. The class is to guess which two are correct and which one is wrong.                                                                                                10'
  2. Who am I?

The printed posters IAC1_1 on A4 size paper are stuck on the walls of the classroom. Pupils walk around and whenever they see a characteristic they consider it applies to them, they write their name on the poster.                                                                                                       10’

  1.  After that the teacher goes to one of the posters, reads the characteristic aloud and all the pupils who consider it applies to them (even though they haven’t put their names on the poster), come together to the front. The process is repeated with all the characteristics. (NFE tool – game)                                                                                10’
  2. Pupils are told that they have to do an assignment presenting their identity. They watch the video IAC1_2 which suggests one possible way of completing the task.                  5’
  3. The final stage of the training session is a couple of days later, when students present their work.
Reflection

Guided reflection:                                                                                                               5’

  • What did you learn about your identity compared to your classmates’ identities?
  • Do you think some identity characteristics are more important than others? Why?
  • Do you want to be who you are and have others respect your identity? Would you change something in yourself if you could?
  • Do you think everybody has the right to have their identity characteristics respected? Why? Exceptions?
Notes

Activity 3 is about making pupils understand that we all live in society, in a community – the class, the school, the neighborhood. We are all different and that is fantastic, but we share some characteristics with other people. Everyone belongs to a group considering one or more characteristics. Whatever your likes/dislikes/ inborn characteristics are, you will always find someone who has similar interests or characteristics.

Activity 5

  • is to be done as a homework assignment or during extracurricular lessons.
  • if the teacher cannot allocate time to have all students present their assignments, the activity could be split in several parts having only one or a couple of students present at a time.
  • during the presentations the audience is asked to watch carefully and identify (if this is the case) characteristics they share with the presenter. After each presentation the other pupils report about their findings (or put their hands up to indicate they share a characteristic with the presenter). In case nobody shares anything with a pupil, the teacher explains that this specific student is unique, so that he/she doesn’t feel isolated.
Digital Resource

IAC1_1 - posters yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/33_IAC1_1.pdf

IAC1_2 - video yesii.eu/atividades/digital/33/IAC1_2_My identities.ppsx


YESI 2023/02/03

62

yesi
2 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / IAC2 - Active Citizenship at school
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva |Ana Torres|Bento Cavadas
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     2 - Progressive muscle relaxation

To release tension from head to toe, students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each. The teacher guides the students; he/she asks them to start with the feet and toes, then move up to the knees, thighs, rumps, chest, arms, hands, neck, jaw, and eyes—all while maintaining deep, slow breaths.

Kelly Roper

Objectives

Students will learn:

  • the importance of being active citizens.

  • the meaning of the sustainable development goals.

Preparation

Suggested reading:

Plastic Free July – Be Part of the Solution

My challenge choices GETTING https://www.plasticfreejuly.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Plastic-Free-July_Action-Picker_Getting-started.pdf

Sea Change (2015). Ocean Literacy. The European Union’s Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (H2020-BG-2014-1). Disponível em http://seachangeproject.eu/seachange-about-2/ocean-literacy

SDG 14 | https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg14

Documentary Midway Movie | https://vimeo.com/30919668

Materials:

Flipchart papers

Crayons

Introduction

To be active citizens, students should be engaged in collective actions in order to contribute to solve a local or global problem. It’s very important for them to act on the problem. With that aim, their participation must be valued in every phase of the collective action.

Students watch the introductory video for module "Active Citizenship and Social Involvement".

Methodology

NFE Tool (Team work and Artistic Creation)

  1. The teacher should do a short presentation about plastic pollution and its problematic, engaging students through the IAC2game - My choices can make a difference. 5´

  2. in a second moment the students must elaborate, in groups, a draw poster about what can each of us do to stop plastic pollution. Each group will create a different design based on the following examples:

  1. Do not use straws

  2. Do not use plastic bags preferring to use reusable bags

  3. Do not use disposable water bottles, preferring to use a reusable bottle

  4. Avoid plastic cups, cutlery and plates

  5. Avoid products wrapped in plastic 18’

After all posters are ready, students should post them in public places at the school. The goal is to alert other children about what they can do to reduce plastic pollution.

Reflection

Teachers should ask the children how they can contribute individually to diminish the plastic waste and to alert others to do the same.

Notes
Digital Resource

IAC2Game - My choises can make a difference


YESI 2023/02/03

63

yesi
3 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC and the protection of the environment
Developed by AENAO
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     18 - Mosquito game

The group stands in a circle and the facilitator tells a story about a plague of mosquitoes and that everybody has to kill the mosquitoes so as they don’t get malaria. The facilitator puts up a mosquito on the head of a person who must lower in order to avoid the mosquito. The two persons next to that person must clap their hands above his/her head to kill the mosquito, but the mosquito escapes and it goes on. When the group is already doing the game well and quickly, the facilitator will add more mosquitoes until it is almost impossible for the group to catch as many mosquitoes.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     8 - Seasons of the year

All players sit in a circle, but not too close to one another. The teacher moves like a plant during the seasons of the year.

Winter: the plants are small, weak and are crunched together on the ground.

Spring: through the stronger sunshine, the plants grow slowly and slowly rise.

Summer: through the warm sun, the plants slowly open their arms, the flowers open their blooms are stand up straight.

Autumn: the sun rays become weaker. The plants begin to slowly shrivel, the blooms and leaves begin to fall away.

Objectives

  • To become familiar with the ecological footprint

  • To raise awareness of ways to protect the environment.

Preparation

  • Suggested Reading

Ecological Footprint

The ecological footprint explained

  • Materials

Video projector, pen and copy of IAC3_Questionnaire for each student

  • Tips

- When the students answer the questionnaire, it is preferably to use an outdoor space or large indoor space.

- If required, teacher can assist students while they answer the questionnaire.

Introduction

Simplicity means to choose ways of living that touch the Earth more lightly and that reduce our ecological footprint.

Duane Elgin

“The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it.”

Robert Swan

Methodology

NFE Tool Questionnaire - adapted and modified from Handbood for Action against Climate Change, pg 26-28

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Identity and Active Citizenship prior to the activity IAC_Intro.   (5')

1. Teacher first shows IAC3_Environment and explains to the students what an ecological footprint is. He/she also needs to focus on the fact students are not to feel guilty but to realise which areas they can improve. For each question, students should consider for themselves which answer to give. If they are not sure which answer to give, they should ask the teacher, or estimate, or else take the average answer.       (10’)

2.  Students are given a copy of the IAC3_Questionnaire and stand in a line. Teacher reads one question at a time - students mark their answers on the questionnaire and take the required steps forward.     (15’)

3.  When all questions are read, students can observe where they are. They come together in a group.  (5’)

* Optional: Students can sum up their results, either in the classroom or at home with their parents. The calculation can be done in two ways. 1st option is to calculate the corresponding points which are shown right next to the steps. The result is the ecological footprint. 2nd option is to calculate the number of steps and multiply by 10 in order to get the final result which is the ecological footprint.Teacher explains what the numbers are and allows students to compare their results with the global average. For results, kindly consult pg 26 of the Handbood for Action against Climate Change   

4.  Teacher shows IAC3 - Tips and discuss briefly the ways to become more eco-friendly.   (5')

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

(a) Was it confusing to calculate your footprint?

(b) How did you feel when you were taking the maximum number of steps?

(c) How did you feel when you found out about your personal ecological footprint?

(d) Do you think that there are things that can change in your daily life in order to reduce your footprint?

(10’)    

Notes

-

Digital Resource

IAC_Intro

IAC3_Questionnaire

IAC3_Environment

IAC3 - Tips


YESI 2023/02/03

64

yesi
4 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in combatting violence
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana da Silva
Duration 55
Energizers yesi     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives
  • Define violence;

  • Identify situations of violence at school;

  • Write 10 rules and 5 words for actively combating violence at school.

Preparation

There are some films/cartoons that can help the facilitator to prepare him/herself for this activity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzKXRuKNd8Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAwqkIzKK08 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u03EHVf-7vI 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YyDJafzuUK4&t=170s

Introduction

Students watch the introductory video for module "Acive Citizenship and Social Involvement".

Violence does not solve anything, however, currently, we watch it every day, in different ways, often without realizing it, so it is important to be aware and active. It often happens at school, often in the school playground, at lunch time, at the entrance of the school, etc.

Children are capable of causing pain, with and without awareness of the act and without putting themselves in the place of others.

>The negative consequences that violent behavior can have on the physical and psychological development of the children involved should be discussed as well as strategies to prevent or stop violence.

Methodology

NFE Tool (Blue skies thinking method, pair work)

  1. >Show the participants the digital infographic with definition of violence. 3´

  2. Use blue skies thinking method for generating ideas to define violence consequences: seat the participants informally in a semi-circle around a flipchart pad or whiteboard for recording ideas. Encourage as many ideas as possible, working to develop the ideas of others and discourage derisive judgments and laughter. 5´

  3. Ask if (and why) words and things children say to one another can be considered violence. Discuss the ideas generated by the group. 5´

  4. Invite the participants to work in pairs and write down 2 rules for recognising and actively preventing or stopping violence at school. 3´.

  5. Then, invite each pair to read aloud 1 rule and register them all on the flipchart pad or whiteboard in front of participants (you can underline key words). If the rule of a pair of participants is similar to another already registered, ask them to read their second rule. Take a photo of the set of rules for sharing it with the group. 10´

Reflection

Ask participants

  • to say if they are going to respect these rules.

  • to choose 5 important/key words that can summarise those rules and help to recognise violence and do something to stop and/or prevent it. 3´

Notes
Digital Resource

Digital infographic with definition of violence


YESI 2023/02/03

65

yesi
5 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in protecting those in need
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva | Ana Torres | Maurício D
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     7 - Connecting eyes

Participants stand in a circle. Each person makes eye contact with another person across the circle. The two walk across the circle and exchange positions, while maintaining eye contact. Many pairs can exchange at the same time, and the group should try to make sure that everyone in the circle is included in the exchange. Tip: Begin by trying this in silence and then exchange greetings in the middle of the circle.

Variations: If the teacher considers, knowing the class atmosphere, that some students might be left not participating, i.e. they try to make eye contact but nobody responds to them and they have no chance to move from their initial position, the moderator could divide the class in 2 groups and introduce a competitive element – after the activity each group will be marked on the ‘team spirit thermometer’ (which could be printed on a A4 paper and the teacher marks the degrees with a marker). The more people you have left not participating in the ‘eye contact’ activity – the lower the degrees to be marked on the thermometer.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     17 - Circle massage

The group forms a circle and faces one direction. Each participant places his/her hands on the shoulders of the person in front of her/him. Each person then gives the person who is in front a shoulder massage. The person being massaged can give a feedback. After a few minutes, the group turns the other way so that the person who has been making the massage is then receiving it in return.

Objectives
  • Introduce the relation between need and protection;

  • Identify and analyse different needs for protection;

  • Raise awareness on the importance of caring about other people’s needs;

  • Learn about different ways of acting to protect persons.

Preparation

Documents that can help to deepen the duty to protect persons

https://europa.eu/european-union/topics/human-rights_en 

https://www.coe.int/en/web/european-social-charter 

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/eli/dir/2012/29/oj/eng 

Introduction

Students watch the introductory video for module "Acive Citizenship and Social Involvement".

When we grow up, it is important to realize that everyone has the right to be protected and to see their needs met and that this often involves being more attentive to the needs of the people around us, decentralizing ourselves from our own needs, seeing the world in an increasingly complex and integrated way. It is important to reflect on different situations in which people need to be protected and what can be done in those situations. 3´

Methodology

NFE Tool - (Tema work and Artistic Creation)

  1. Facilitator shows the vídeo and organises a brainstorming about what it is to protect a person. 3`

  2. >Then, handles a paper sheet and a pen to each participant and asks them to close their eyes and think, individually, about a situation in which they felt protected. 3`

  3. After 2 or 3 minutes, tells them that they can open their eyes and have 5 minutes to make a quick drawing (sketch) of the situation and write below the drawing one sentence that sums up the situation. If needed, it is possible to explain that it can be situations that involved a great danger but it can also be more simple situations like, for instance, “I was hungry because I lost the money I had to buy a snack at the school bar and my teacher gave me a cereal and fruit bar”. 5`

  4. Participants are invited to stick their papers on the wall or put them on the floor aligned against a wall and everyone has 2 minutes to look at them. 3`

  5. Then, follows a conversation about what was the person’s need, who offered protection and what was done to protect. 5`` 

  6. One volunteer or the facilitator can write down on a board a chart like the one below and fill it in while the conversation is taking place:

What was the need?

Who offered protection?

What was done to protect?

Reflection

Facilitator can ask the following questions to the group: 5´

  • Was it difficult to think about a situation in which you felt protected?

  • What can we do when we do to “see” the other’s needs? 

  • What can we do when we do not know how to protect someone in need?

Notes
Digital Resource

vídeo


YESI 2023/02/03

66

yesi
6 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in respecting and protecting animals (outdoor activities)
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives

Teaching children to care for and respect animal life lets them know the importance of being kind to all creatures, whether great or small. Learning kindness to animals at an early age can benefit children as it helps them become better and more compassionate individuals as they grow.

Preparation
  1. Identify a nearby park or easy-to-reach outdoor site where pupils can observe animal life (birds, insects, etc.)
  2. Print the observation table AC6.1_1 for each group/pupil.
  3. Watch the video AC6.1_2 to get the idea of the acting activity in the reflection section.
  4. Plan the visit to the outdoor observation site with the necessary support of parents, school authorities, permissions, etc.
  5.  Bring drawing pencils for each group/pupil or ask the students to bring their own ones.
Introduction

Compassion for animals is intimately associated with goodness of character, and it may be confidently asserted that he who is cruel to animals cannot be a good man.

                                                                                                                     Arthur Schopenhauer

Students watch the introductory video for module "Acive Citizenship and Social Involvement".  5'

Methodology

Organize an outdoor observation walk (to a local park/fields/forest) aimed at teaching pupils to observe animals in their natural setting without disturbing them.

Part of effectively teaching pupils to respect animals is to make them learn how to observe animals in their natural setting. This means simply looking at them and taking note of their behavior or appearance without disturbing or scaring them away. Ask them to observe without touching. Pupils could take notes of how the animals are behaving, take photos/videos with their mobiles, draw what they see, etc. Recorded visual materials might also be used in Nature Studies lessons or any other cross-curricular activities.

Suggested observations:

  • Birds who often like to drink from ponds or outdoor wall or freestanding water fountains. If you see a bird stopping by a fountain for a drink of water, teach pupils not to drive them away.
  • Watch butterflies land on nearby bushes and draw them/ take photos or take notes of their behaviour.
  • Look under rocks to find bugs or centipedes and take notes/ photos/ make drawings.
  • Look for squirrels in the trees and take notes of their behaviour.

Pupils work individually or in pairs and keep track of their observations in the provided observation table IAC6.1_1 (to be printed beforehand).

Reflection

Pupils report about their observations with facts from the observation tables, share pictures, photos and videos they have taken or mirror the behaviour of the animals they have observed. The latter is something kids love to do (e.g. stepping in the shoes of the sparrows from AC6.1_2)      10'

Notes

Timing:

Outdoor activities: 35 min. or as much time you have.

Reflection: 10 min. (could be done outdoors or indoors in the classroom)

The activity is to be done outdoors during a school trip or a specially organized outing. The overall duration will vary depending on the distance to the site you visit. Once you are there, the duration of the activity is 35 min.

Tips: What to do in case students spot a living creature (and manage to take a photo of it), e.g. a bug (beetle, ladybug, cricket) but don’t know its name, and nobody, including the teacher, can name it? It is easy – use Google Lens (IAC6.1_GoogleLens instructions)

Follow up: Pupils might launch a DIY project of making bird water feeder from a plastic bottle (tutorial: AC6.1_3)

Digital Resource

AC6.1_1 - observation table yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/38_AC6.1_1 Observation table.pdf

AC6.1_2 - video yesii.eu/atividades/videos/38_IAC6.1_2 EN.mp4

AC6.2_3 - video yesii.eu/atividades/digital/38/IAC6.1_3 EN.mp4

Instruction: How to use Google Lens  http://yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/38_IAC6_Google Lens instructions_en.pdf 


YESI 2023/02/03

67

yesi
6 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in respecting and protecting animals (indoor activities)
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     15 - Animal roundup

The teacher tells to the class to silently think of an animal. Then he/she tells to the group that without talking, they need to arrange themselves on a line from largest to smallest animals. Group members can only make gestures and the noise of their animal. After they have finished, teacher ask to the students to say the animal they were supposed to be to see if the order is correct.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     6 - Bee breathing

The teacher instructs the students to get in a comfortable position to practice bee breathing. They have to imagine that they are sitting on a leaf or a flower petal, to sit straight and allow the leaf or petal to gently support them.

The teacher gives students the following instructions:

Breathe in, allowing the air to just gently come in through your nose, filling up your lungs.

As you breathe out, buzz like a bee. See how long your buzz can last. See how far your bee is going to fly before sitting down and resting again. Buzz. Buzz. Buzz.

On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a loud, strong buzz.

On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a soft buzz.

When the exercise is finished, the teacher gives time for a short discussion:

Does it feel different with a strong or a soft buzz?

How does your body feel?

Optional (use if time allows): After breathing practice, draw a picture of a bumblebee and the leaf or flower that you were “sitting on” in your imagination. This picture can be used as a relaxation practice reminder. When you see the picture, practice being like a Bee on a leaf and practice a Bee breath.

Objectives

Teaching children to care for and respect animal life lets them know the importance of being kind to all creatures, whether great or small. Learning kindness to animals at an early age can benefit children as it helps them become better and more compassionate individuals as they grow.

Through planning the "Clean Up" activities student will improve their analytical and presentation skills.

Preparation

Required equipment: projector and loud speakers

Required materials:

  • Cardboard, markers, coloured pencils – for the posters in activity 2.2;
  • Flip chart or white board - to record students’ ideas from activity 3.2.
Introduction

Only when we have become nonviolent towards all life will we have learned to live well with others.

Cesar Chavez

Students watch the introductory video for module "Acive Citizenship and Social Involvement".5'

Methodology

NFE tools: discussion, team work, artistic creation, brain storming.

  1. Teach pupils to clean up litter because they care for animals.                                    10’

Encourage pupils to clean up any litter that they find on the playground, in the park or in the yard. Explain that cats and dogs can get poisoned from seemingly innocuous items such as chocolate, cleaning products, batteries. Small birds can choke on small pieces of plastic, while ducks, fish, and other creatures that live in the water can be harmed by plastic soda rings and other trash. Ask students to share any stories they know about cleaning up litter to help animals or cases they know about animals being harmed due to litter.

  1. Take the initiative to clean up:

2.1. Watch the video AC6.2_1 Lilly’s Plastic Pickup                                                      5’

2.2. Plan a similar campaign in the school yard/local park/ neighborhood. Students can choose between working in a group or planning personal activities like the girl from the video. Students who prefer to work on their own, start planning their activities. The remaining part of the class is divided in big groups of ca. 10 people. The task is to plan a “Clean Up Day”. They have to come up with all the details of the campaign, e.g. what is to be cleaned, what materials/equipment is needed (if any), meeting point, timing, etc.. After agreeing on the details, they have to create a poster to advertise it (or present it) to the rest of the school.                                                                           15’

  1. Taking care of animals:

3.1. Watch the video AC6.2_2 Become an animal rescue volunteer.                           5’

3.2. Pupils discuss what they can do to help animals and show them they care, love and respect them taking ideas from the video or come up with their own ideas.               5’

Reflection

Six thinking hats (Eduard de Bono) – guided reflection: Thinking about past and future events and decisions can be very frustrating. Life is a complex thing and everything might seem to be mixed up and complicated. It is usually a good idea to distinguish between the different aspects of an event or a decision in order to see the real picture. Here is how we can do it. Imagine that when you put on a hat of specific colour, you consider only one aspect of a case or a decision.                                                                                                                5’  

  1. The WHITE hat is the hat of facts. So, put on your white hats and think (and share) what facts you learned in today’s activity.
  2. The RED hat is the hat of emotions. So, put on your red hat and think (and share) how you were feeling during the activity or during a specific part of the activity.
  3. The BLACK hat is the negative hat. Put it on and think (and share) what you didn’t like in today’s activity.
  4. The   YELLOW  hat is the positive hat. Put it on and think (and share) what you liked in today’s activity.
  5.  The GREEN hat is the hat of creativity. Put it on and think (and share) how you could use what you experienced today in real life.
  6.  The BLUE hat is the learning hat. So, put on your blue hat and think (and share) what you learned in today’s activity.
Notes

As a follow-up of the training the teacher could hold another session and choose to do the following activities:

  • Organize the "Clean-up Day" campaign as planned by one of the groups, or incorporating ideas from all groups - as a class or whole-school activity;
  • Have students who planned their individual clean-up activities tell the class what they have done;
  • Ask students to share if they have put some of the ideas discussed in activity 3.2 in practice.
Digital Resource

AC6.2_1 - video youtu.be/k84pC1ISfzo

AC6,2_2 - video youtu.be/CH28yx8B1wU


YESI 2023/02/03

68

yesi
7 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in Europe (our European Values)
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     21 - Name game with balls

Students stand in a circle. The teacher gives a ball to one of the students. He/she holds the ball, then says the name of another participant and passes them the ball. After a few passes, the teacher adds one more ball in the game, and then – another one. This way there will be 2/3/4 balls in the air at a time and all participants will be calling each other’s names

Relaxing Exercises yesi     3 - Guided breathing

Teacher asks the students to close their eyes (if comfortable), inhale for a count of four, then exhale for a count of four (all through the nose, which adds a natural resistance to the breath). Then, with one hand on the chest and the other on the belly, the students can take a deep breath in through the nose and exhale through the mouth, ensuring this way that the diaphragm (not the chest) inflates with enough air to create a stretch in the lungs

Jordan Shakeshaft

Objectives

Students will:

  • Learn more about European values;
  • Think over their own values and compare them to the values of other pupils;
  • Develop their reasoning skills.
Preparation

Equipment: laptop and projector for IAC7_1;

Preparation - printed deliverables:

  • IAC7_2 – one copy/student;
  • flashcards with emotions: IAC7_3 – one set for the class.
Introduction

Values are the fundamentals of society. They significantly influence our actions and choices. They are the foundation of everyday life.

Students watch the introductory video for module "Acive Citizenship and Social Involvement". 5'

Methodology
  1. Students watch the presentation and discuss what the presented values mean for them using examples from their everyday life in school or at home. (NFE tool – brainstorming, discussion)                                                                                     10’
  2. Students are asked to write a list of the things they love (in the provided table IAC7_2). This will help them get in touch with their values.

2.1. Firstly, the students fill in only the left column with their answers.           10'

Answers will vary but you can see a pre-filled table with a few examples below:

What types of books do you like to read?

Answer

What value is the answer connected with?

Fairy tales

Encyclopedias

Books about animals

What subjects do you like in school?

Answer

What value is the answer connected with?

Nature studies

PE

Literature 

Foreign languages

What motivates you?

Answer

What value is the answer connected with?

Playing basketball/football etc. (team sports)

Training for swimming competitions

Drawing and making things 

Reading books 

Watching cartoons (TITLE)

2.2. Students are asked to think why they love all these things. This will link the things they like to their values.

Pupils are asked to fill in the right column with their answers choosing from the non-exclusive list of values (provided in IAC7_2) .                                                                                                        15'

Answers will vary but here is a pre-filled table with possible examples:

What types of books do you like to read?

Answer

What value is the answer connected with?

Fairy tales

Bravery, honesty

Encyclopedias

Curiosity

Books about animals

Love, empathy

What subjects do you like in school?

Answer

What value is the answer connected with?

Nature studies

Curiosity, exploration

PE

Following rules, competing

Literature 

Beauty

Foreign languages

Open mindedness, learning about other cultures

What motivates you?

Answer

What value is the answer connected with?

Playing basketball/football etc. (team sports)

Teamwork and cooperation

Training for swimming competitions

Perfection

Drawing and making things 

Creativity

Reading books 

Curiosity, compassion

Watching cartoons TITLE

Depending on the contents, but possibly bravery, love, beauty, loyalty

This activity is a way to support students to identify what their core values are and learn that they are part of their everyday life.

Reflection

Guided reflection:                                                                                      10'                                         The printed flashcards with emotions (IAC7_3) are placed round the classroom. The teacher asks the pupils:

1. How did you feel during the training? Pupils go to one of the spaces marked with the feeling which represents their overall emotion regarding the training activity as a whole: 1. Interested ; 2. Content; 3. Confused; 4. Surprised; 5. Excited; 6. Happy; 7. Embarrassed; 8. Nervous. When pupils split in the groups, they share in the group why they chose this feeling. After that one representative of the group reports to the other groups the why the pupils from his group have chosen the corresponding feeling.

Notes
Digital Resource

IAC7_1 - video yesii.eu/atividades/digital/39/IAC7_1.ppsx

IAC7_2 - handout yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/39_IAC7_2.pdf

IAC7_3 - flashcards with emotions yesii.eu/atividades/pdf/39_IAC7_3.pdf


YESI 2023/02/03

69

yesi
8 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in healthy living
Developed by AENAO
Duration 55
Energizers yesi     15 - Animal roundup

The teacher tells to the class to silently think of an animal. Then he/she tells to the group that without talking, they need to arrange themselves on a line from largest to smallest animals. Group members can only make gestures and the noise of their animal. After they have finished, teacher ask to the students to say the animal they were supposed to be to see if the order is correct.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Objectives

  • To become familiar with aspects of healthy living

  • To be aware why healthy living is important

Preparation
  • Materials

Markers in different colours, big sheets (or A4) of paper.

  • Tips

Optional: Teacher can ask students (right after reflection) to actually apply some of the aspects of healthy living for a week (eg reduce TV time, go for a walk with their parents, study on time so that they reduce their stress, prepare their own breakfast, go to sleep early, etc). They can discuss the benefits the following week.

Introduction

Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.

Jim Rohn

Methodology

NFE Tool Brainstorming, team work, artistic creation

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Identity and Active Citizenship prior to the activity IAC_Intro.   (5')

1.   Students watch IAC8 – Healthy Oliver (5’)

2.   Teacher asks students to brainstorm about three major pillars of healthy living:

a)   Nutrition

b)   Exercise

c)   Mental health (eg not to be stressed when studying for an exam)

Their brainstorming will conclude in ways to help Oliver so that he feels better and be healthy              (10’)

3.   Teacher divides students in 3 groups according to the 3 major pillars mentioned above.

Group A. Nutrition

Group B. Exercise

Group C. Mental health

4.   Each group creates a poster that shows the healthy model of the group     (15’)

5.   The groups present the posters. Can these models provide a healthy living to Oliver (and hence themselves)?       (5’)

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

(a)  Was it difficult to identify the aspects of healthy living?

(b)  Do you think that you will be able to apply some of these aspects (if you are not doing so already)? If yes, which ones?

                       (5’)

Notes

-

Digital Resource

IAC_Intro

IAC8 – Healthy Oliver


YESI 2023/02/03

70

yesi
9 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC and volunteering
Developed by AENAO
Duration 65
Energizers yesi     1 - Break the Circle

The teacher assigns randomly a number to each student, depending on the group size, i.e. for 20 students, numbers 1-4 are ok, so each group has 5 people (groups could be synthesized by the students with the same number, i.e. all having been assigned number ‘1’ or by students where each one has his/her own unique number 1-4; similarly and more fun is grouping by ingredient for a Greek salad, where every student is i.e. ‘tomato’, ‘cucumber’, ‘onion’, ‘oregano’, etc.) Once the groups have been formed, they make  circles and the teacher randomly picks a number (or an ingredient) to step out of the circle and try to break in, while the others remaining are instructed to not let go of their hands no matter what. This can be repeated once more with another number stepping out.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     17 - Circle massage

The group forms a circle and faces one direction. Each participant places his/her hands on the shoulders of the person in front of her/him. Each person then gives the person who is in front a shoulder massage. The person being massaged can give a feedback. After a few minutes, the group turns the other way so that the person who has been making the massage is then receiving it in return.

Objectives

  • Understand the concept of volunteering and its importance

  • Relate active citizenship and volunteering

Preparation
  • Suggested Reading

Volunteering, pg 4-5

Volunteer stories 

  • Materials

Whiteboard/flipchart, markers, printed IAC9_Plan

Introduction

The term “volunteering” is used to describe an altruistic activity where an individual or group provides services to another individual or group for no financial or social gain.  

“Volunteers are not paid - not because they are worthless, but because they are priceless.” 

(A volunteer’s quote)

Methodology

NFE Tool Brainstorming, Discussion in groups, team work

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Identity and Active Citizenship prior to the activity IAC_Intro.  (5')

  1. Students go through IAC9 - V for Volunteer. Teacher explains the concept of volunteering. (5’)

  2. Teacher asks students to think about their skills (eg someone could have a beautiful voice or could play the piano, someone could be good at drawing or dancing, etc). Students brainstorm on these skills.     (10’)

  3. Students are divided into 3-4 groups according to their brainstorming. For example those who are good at sports could form one group, those who are good at drawing could form another group, etc. If there is a big inequality in the number of students per group, so that one group could be very large compared to others, then the teacher can:

  • ask the students of the large group to think about another skill that they have, OR

  • divide the students of the large group into two smaller ones.       (5’)

* Teacher ensures that all students are members of a group.

  1. When the groups are formed, teacher gives each group IAC9_Plan and asks the students to form a plan on how they can volunteer and offer to teach students from other groups. The groups discuss on that, focusing on the solution (eg what can a student offer to others, how much time does he/she need to provide that form of “training”, etc). The groups write their proposals on a printed IAC9_Plan.  (15’)

  2. Students present their proposals on the plenary (5’)

  3. Teacher encourages students to actually volunteer and provide their services to their classmates. He/she asks the students to volunteer and inform their classmates on when and how they can teach their skills (for eg John who is good at drawing volunteers to teach his classmates how to draw on Wednesday - this service could have a duration of 1 hour, etc). Students can write under their name on the IAC9_Plan their volunteering service.     (5’)

Note: Teacher should be available to volunteer and assist the groups to provide their services. They assign a period of 2-3 weeks as their “volunteering period”.

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

(a) Was it difficult to think about your skill(s)?

(b) Have you ever thought of offering something as a volunteer? 

(c) Do you think that volunteering is important in the society?

* Optional: if there are offers in step 6 and students actually volunteer during the “volunteering period”, teacher can have a conversation again at the end of this period. He/She can ask students the following:

(d) How did you feel when volunteering?

(e) To those who were “trained” from others: how did you feel when you were taught a skill that you didn't know before?              (5’) 

Notes

For partners: 

Volunteer Stories are available in many languages. Find your own language using the corresponding link on the website OR you can find similar stories in your own country to share with teachers.

Teacher and Students can watch the following video (optional) at home - or if there is enough time after the completion of the activity: 

Pip - A movie for volunteering and helping others  (5')

Digital Resource

IAC_Intro

IAC9_Plan

IAC9 - V for Volunteer


YESI 2023/02/03

71

yesi
10 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC and law / democracy
Developed by AENAO
Duration 65
Energizers yesi     13 - Simon says

Teacher tells the group that they should follow instructions when he/she starts the instruction by saying “Simon says...”. If the teacher does not begin the instructions with the words “Simon says”, then the group should not follow the instructions! The teacher begins by saying something like “Simon says clap your hands” while clapping their hands. The participants follow. The teacher speeds up the actions, always saying “Simon says” first. After a short while, the “Simon says” is omitted. Those participants who do follow the instructions anyway are ‘out’ of the game. The game can be continued for as long as it remains fun.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     14 - Give me your energy

The students stand in a circle. The teacher starts, pretending he/she is holding a ball on the hands and passing it to the student on his/her right; this one do the same, until the ball comes back to the teacher. The ball needs to be passed in a gentle way, as it is very precious. At the second round, the teacher passes the ball to students in another side of the circle, making a gesture and a noise. The students will do the same until everyone will have touched the ball at least once.  The ball can be passed in any way (in form of kick, kiss…), pretending it becomes bigger or smaller depending on the will of the students. 

Objectives

  • Become familiar with the concept of rule (law and the democratic process of voting)

  • Be concerned about elements of a rule - in regards to formation, voting and applying it.

Preparation

  • Suggested Reading

Democracy

Rule of Law and Democracy

  • Materials

Whiteboard/flipchart, markers, printed copies of IAC10_A and IAC10_B.

Introduction

“Democracy is when the indigent, and not the men of property, are the rulers.”

Aristotle

“As the straight do not need rules, so the law does not need justice.”

Epictetus

Methodology

NFE Tool Brainstorming, Simulation

Introduction Step: Students watch the introductory video of Identity and Active Citizenship prior to the activity IAC_Intro.  (5')

  1. Teacher shows IAC10 - Aristotles Speaking and introduces the concept of law and democracy. (5’)

  2. Students brainstorm about an issue/problem that there is in their classroom or school. Examples could be: not being quiet when teacher presents the lesson, not eating healthy meals at school,  mischievous behaviour during breaks, school does not have enough money to buy new computers, renew books in the school’s library, etc.                   (10’)

  3. Teacher (and students) decide which issue/problem they need to focus on. Once they decide, students are divided in 3 groups. All groups are preparing the new rule (law), using the Worksheet IAC10_A.        (15’)

  • Group A. This group will focus on Sections 10.1 and 10.2 of the worksheet.

  • Group B. This group will focus on Sections 10.3 and 10.4 of the worksheet.

  • Group C. This group will focus on Sections 10.5 and 10.6 of the worksheet.

  1. Once the rule is ready, groups read it to the plenary. Then, teacher initiates voting - all students need to vote whether they agree with this rule or not, by showing to the plenary the corresponding image from IAC10_B. Teacher should highlight that the process of voting is essential in democracy, the result however could be anything (either positive or negative).  (10’)

After reflection, students do the IAC10 - Quiz.      (5’)

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

(a) Was it difficult or easy to prepare a new rule? 

(b) In case of a positive vote (which means that the rule will be applied as set), do you think that there should be consequences to those who disobey? 

(c) In case of a negative vote, why do think that has happened? Do you think that the result could be different if the rule was different? If yes, in what way?        (5’)

Notes

-

Digital Resource

IAC_Intro

IAC10_A

IAC10_B

IAC10 - Aristotles Speaking

IAC10 - Quiz


YESI 2023/02/03

72

yesi
11 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC - protecting my rights and the rights of others; duties and obligations
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 65
Energizers yesi     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives

Students will:

  • Learn about their responsibilities and duties to other people;
  • Learn about their rights and the limitations to their rights resulting from the rights of other people;
  • Improve their analytical skills;
  •  Improve their presentation skills.
Preparation
  1. Required equipment: laptop and projector for playing the digital resources IAC11_1 and IAC11_2 to the whole class, or have laptops for each group (activities 1 and 3.1)
  2. Required materials:
  • flip chart or white board (for the teacher in activity 2.2);
  • sheets of paper and pens (for the students in activity 2.1);
  • rope (or coloured sticky tape) and and – signs (printed or drawn) on A4 sheets of paper (for the reflection section).
Introduction

We all have rights, and we all want the others to respect our rights. This results in some obligations we have, and some limitations to our rights.

Students watch the introductory video for module "Acive Citizenship and Social Involvement". 5'

Methodology
  1. Introduction to our rights.

We all have rights and we all want to live in a place where everybody respects our rights. Pupils play the game and try to match the images with the corresponding rights. They can do that together as a class activity, discuss the situations and the possible answers. Another option is to have each student (or small groups of 2 or 3 students) play the game on a personal device and answer the questions individually or as a group (DT IAC11_1).         10’

  1. Classroom rules which will make everybody feel well at school.                              15'

2.1. Students work in couples and each couple comes up with 5 things which, in their opinion, are the most important ones to make them feel well at school, e.g. 1. To be part of the games; 2. Not to be mocked at if I make a mistake when the teacher asks a question; 3. I don’t want anybody to touch the things I put on my desk during the breaks; 4. I don’t want anyone to hurt me; 5. I want all pupils to be kind to each other. Couples write the results of their work on a piece of paper but don’t write their names, and give the papers to the teacher (NFE tool: blue skies thinking).

2.2. The teacher sums up all wishes (grouping the similar ones) and writes down the final list of rules on the board or a flip chart.

  1. “The Missing Mobile”- case study.

3.1. Students are divided in groups of ca. 4 people. Each group needs a laptop to play the interactive case study (IAC11_2). Group members discuss the options at each step and choose one after reaching an agreement. When they finish the game, they discuss the possible drawbacks and advantages of their choices (as suggested in the resource).                    10’

3.2. In the plenary the groups present their stories based on the choices they have made at each step. They talk about the advantages (and/or drawbacks). After the presentation of all stories, the class votes for the best way to behave in this situation.                                                10’

Reflection

The teacher puts a long rope (or colored sticky tape) in the floor with a " "sign at one end, and a "-" sign on the other, and  explains that the " " sign means YES, and the "-" sign stands for NO. The positions between the signs indicate the respective level of approval/ disapproval. To sum up the training, the teacher asks the students to stand up and answer the following questions by going to the " " or  "-" signs. If there is enough time, students could comment why they chose the respective position along the rope.                                                                                                     5'

  1. Did you like activity 1 (the guessing your rights game)?
  2. Did you like 2.1 activity?
  3. Did you like activity 3?
  4.  Do you think the rules created in activity 2.2 will be useful for you to feel better at school?
Notes

Activity 3.1: if it is not possible to have a computer/ laptop for each group, the activity can be done as a whole class activity – playing the presentation many times, choosing different options for each step (as suggested by students).

Digital Resource

IAC11_1 - Interactive game https://wordwall.net/resource/1930515

IAC11_2 - interactive case study yesii.eu/atividades/digital/43/IAC11_2.ppsx


YESI 2023/02/03

73

yesi
12 yesiIdentity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / Active Citizenship and my personal power to change
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva | Ana Torres | Maurício D
Duration 60
Energizers yesi     17 - Toaster or Rock Star

The group starts in a circle with one person in the center. The person in the center points at someone in the circle and says “Toaster” or “Rock star”.

  • If the person in the center says “toaster”, the person being pointed at needs to crouch down and jump up and say “butter me I’m done.” The people on either side should arms up and out strait creating a “toaster” around the person being pointed at.
  • If the person in the center says “Rock star”, the person being pointed at needs to hold his/her hands in front of their mouth as if he/she were singing into a microphone. The people on each side turn away from the person who’s been pointed at and pretend to play the guitar.

Relaxing Exercises yesi     13 - Body massage

The students stand in a circle: they need to follow all the movement the teacher does and massage themselves. The teacher starts to massage different parts of his/her body, starting from the head till the feet (it’s better if they take off their shoes). The teacher explains how the massage needs to be done, if delicate or more energetic.

Optional: The teacher can also ask to the students to massage another classmate.

Objectives

Identify positive and negative moods (state of mind, what we feel in each moment);

Reflect on one’s power to change his own negative mood and other people’s moods into positive ones;

Refresh the awareness that positive moods are fundamental for everyone’s well-being and for changing the difficulties and problems into challenges.

Preparation

This author can help to reflect upon this activity:

https://www.theemotionmachine.com/how-to-use-the-power-of-emotional-contagion-to-change-your-mood/

Introduction

The moods lead us to act in certain ways, being able to open or close opportunities for a better life (relationships with other people, school performance, employment, health, etc.). Being an active citizen for change means doing things and coordinating our actions to achieve certain goals for greater well-being: ours and others. So it is important to think that we are able to transform our mood when we do not feel well and having empathy to make conexion with others to understand and help transform their mood, trying to see things from a positive or at least less negative perspective.

Students watch the introductory video for module "Acive Citizenship and Social Involvement".

Methodology

NFE Tool Roll Play

  1. Ask participants to play the  Game and to write down some of the positive and negative moods. 5'

  2. Organize the participants in pairs and tell them that one person has to simulate a negative mood (state of mind) that is in the game, and the other must guess what mood it is and then try to change that negative mood into a positive one by talking or communicating by gestures or looks, etc. Then they switch roles. 18'

Reflection

What strategies did you use to stimulate the mood change?

Do you think that negative moods often block us?

How can negative moods affect us and our environment?

You can remind participants that often our mood (negative or positive) is contagious: when I am suspicious I inspire distrust in other people and when I am confident I inspire confidence around me. That is why it is so important to develop the power to change our moods and understand the other person's moods because not only a person’s negative mood conditions his/her actions but it also can affect the mood and actions of everyone around. 5'

Notes

Play the Game

Positive moods: trust, hope, acceptance, insight, resolution, serenity, ambition

Negative moods: distrust, hopelessness, resignation, resentment, agony, arrogance, confusion

Digital Resource

Introductory video 

Game 


YESI 2023/02/03

74

yesi

Bibliography

AENAO - The Violet Project . (n.d.). Retrieved from http://aenao.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/V-Package1.pdf

Council of Europe. (2012). Council of Europe. Retrieved from Compass: Manual for Human Rights Education with Young People: http://www.coe.int/web/compass/home

Cross - Cultural Communication: Many Faces of Diversity. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MisplEvcl9c

Dolci Amico; Amico Fausto. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://danilodolci.org/media/English.pdf
EU Justice and Consumers. (n.d.). Retrieved from 5 Consumers Rights you should know: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SaRKSdeHsjw

European Commission . (n.d.). European Commission. Retrieved from 5 Key Consumers' Rights: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/newsroom/consumer-marketing/events/140317_en.htm

European Corporate Governance Institute. (n.d.). Oxford Union style debate . Retrieved from http://www.ecgi.org/conferences/fese_efmc2005/ou_rules.htm

FS2C From School to Community. (n.d.). Children and Students as Agents of Social Change . Retrieved from http://cesie.org/media/handbook-fs2c-en.pdf

Heraldo V. Richards; Ayanna F. Brown; Timothy B.Forde. (2007, Jan/Feb). Addressing Diversity in Schools: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy. Teaching Exceptional Children, p. 64.

Identity and Diversity Toolbox. (n.d.). Salto Youth. Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/tools/toolbox/tool/identity-and-diversity-tool-box.1365

Intercultural game (Rafa Rafa). (n.d.). Salto Youth. Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/tools/toolbox/tool/intercultural-game-rafa-rafa.1502/

Jigsaw of Human Rights. (n.d.). Salto Youth. Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/tools/toolbox/tool/jigsaw-of-human-rights.281/

Jordan Shakeshaft. (n.d.). greatist. Retrieved from http://greatist.com/happiness/breathing-exercises-relax

Kelly Roper. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://stress.lovetoknow.com/Top_Ten_Relaxation_Techniques_Children

Millenium Training and Development Institute. (n.d.). SALTO Youth. Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/downloads/toolbox_tool_download-file-1327/SimGame 3 - HOWGH.pdf

Mind Maple. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.mindmaple.com/downloads/Windows/
Nancy Flowers. (2009). Council of Europe, Compasito. Retrieved from http://www.eycb.coe.int/compasito/

Nansy Spetsioti. (n.d.). YouTube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfccrwUlROU

yesi
Indice Page
Credits 3
Acknowledgements 4
Preface 5
Introduction 6
Instruction to teachers 8
Class preparation 9
Non Formal Education 12
Use of Digital Tools 18
Evaluation 19
Energizers 20
Relaxing Exercises 26
1 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / Freedom from discrimination 34
2 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to life, liberty and personal security 35
3 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to opinion and expression 36
4 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to conscience and religion 37
5 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to privacy 38
6 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right of refugee children 39
7 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The rights of disabled children 40
8 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to social care and health 41
9 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to education 42
10 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to rest and leisure, to play 43
11 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to work 44
12 - Human Rights – Children’s Rights / The right to justice and law 45
1 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Body diversity 47
2 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Language / Country diversity 48
3 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Cultural / Ethnic diversity 49
4 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Religious diversity 50
5 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Gender diversity (Man vs Woman) 51
6 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Diversity at school 52
7 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Age diversity 53
8 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Diversity and stereotypes 54
9 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Diversity in abilities_ Ability and disability_social inclusion 55
10 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Social inclusion: My Dream Classroom 56
10 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Socioeconomic diversity and social inclusion 57
11 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Bullying and social inclusion 58
12 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Racism_social inclusion 59
1 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / My identities 61

yesi
2 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / IAC2 - Active Citizenship at school 62
3 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC and the protection of the environment 63
4 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in combatting violence 64
5 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in protecting those in need 65
6 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in respecting and protecting animals (outdoor activities) 66
6 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in respecting and protecting animals (indoor activities) 67
7 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in Europe (our European Values) 68
8 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC in healthy living 69
9 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC and volunteering 70
10 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC and law / democracy 71
11 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / AC - protecting my rights and the rights of others; duties and obligations 72
12 - Identity, Active Citizenship and Social Involvement / Active Citizenship and my personal power to change 73
Bibliography 74